There are 3 main definitions of ash in English:

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ash1

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noun

1 [mass noun] (also ashes) The powdery residue left after the burning of a substance: cigarette ash I turned over the ashes
More example sentences
  • He looked over at her, raising his eyebrow, tapping his cigarette and sending burning ashes into the air.
  • Rubbing cigarette ashes, powdered pumice, or a piece of walnut into spots may also help remove them.
  • The three African generals sat around a table, tipping cigarette ash into a marble tray and tutting about the revolution going on outside.
Synonyms
1.1 (ashes) The remains of a human body after cremation or burning: his ashes were scattered on the waters of the Ganges River
More example sentences
  • Two months after the Staff of Energy was destroyed, Will's body was burned into ashes and thrown into the Atlantic Ocean.
  • A funeral director later identified the substance as human ashes.
  • He is part of the team investigating what is happening to the growing volume of human ashes now removed from crematoria.
1.2The mineral component of an organic substance, as assessed from the residue left after burning: coal contains higher levels of ash than premium fuels
More example sentences
  • Soap was first made by boiling goat fat, water, and ash high in potassium carbonate.
  • Wheat plants grown in limed and nonlimed soil fertilized with poultry ash or potassium phosphate produced similar yields.
  • The ash contains calcium and phosphorous essential to healthy milk.
2 (the Ashes) A trophy for the winner of a series of Test matches in a cricket season between England and Australia.
[from a mock obituary notice published in the Sporting Times (2 September 1882), with reference to the symbolical remains of English cricket being taken to Australia after a sensational victory by the Australians at the Oval]

Origin

Old English æsce, aexe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch as and German Asche.

More
  • The two meanings of ash, the powder and the tree, started out as two completely different words. In Old English aesce or aexe referred to the powder, and aesc referred to the tree. When something turns to ashes in your mouth it becomes bitterly disappointing or worthless. The origins of this phrase can be traced back to John de Mandeville's Travels, a 14th-century work claiming to be an account of the author's travels in the East, where there is a description of a legendary fruit known as the Dead Sea fruit, sometimes also called the apple of Sodom. Although the fruit was appetizing to look at, it dissolved into smoke and ashes as soon as anyone tried to eat it The name of the Ashes, the cricket competition played roughly every other year between England and Australia comes from a mock obituary notice published in the Sporting Times newspaper on 2 September 1882, after the Australians had sensationally beaten the English team at the Oval: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of English Cricket Which Died at the Oval on 29th August, 1882. Deeply lamented by a large circle of sorrowing friends and acquaintances. R.I.P. N.B.—The body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia.’ During the subsequent 1882–3 Test series in Australia the captain of the English team declared that his mission was to recover the Ashes for England. During the tour a group of women presented him with a wooden urn containing the ashes of a bail or stump, which has since been kept at Lord's Cricket Ground.

Phrases

turn to ashes in one's mouth

1
Become bitterly disappointing or worthless: take care your dreams don’t turn to ashes in your mouth
More example sentences
  • How quickly those hopeful words turned to ashes in his mouth as barely had the phrase left his lips than Dulwich had found the net for a fifth time.
  • But somewhere in most people's telling of the tale, brave Sir Roger somehow morphs into a sort of bad teddy bear, and Prince David's freedom and joy turn to ashes in his mouth.
  • Micki pushed her plate back, the last mouthful of omelet turning to ashes in her mouth.

rise (or emerge) from the ashes

2
Be renewed after destruction: the new Europe that has emerged from the ashes of the Second World War
[see rise like a phoenix from the ashes (at phoenix)]
More example sentences
  • You will rise from the ashes of your own destruction to become more powerful than ever before.
  • Symbolically as the natural ruler of Scorpio, Pluto is the phoenix bird rising from the ashes of his own self destruction.
  • The company began to sell carpets and rugs direct to customers in the area from its factory shop after it rose from the ashes, and this aspect of the business has become just as important as the commercial side.

Derivatives

ashy

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • This time, though, old and new mesh perfectly, all hard greys and ashy blacks, and we believe.
  • Great is its seething, like a burning cinder, a grievous thing of an ashy colour.
  • He turned to Karl, his face ashy and covered in sweat, but he was grinning widely.

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There are 3 main definitions of ash in English:

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ash2

Line breaks: ash

noun

1 (also ash tree) A tree with compound leaves, winged fruits, and hard pale timber, widely distributed throughout north temperate regions.
  • Genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae: many species, especially the common (or European) ash (F. excelsior)
Example sentences
  • The woods most often used for balsamic include chestnut, ash tree, cherry, mulberry, juniper and oak.
  • The hazelnut tree is associated with fertility while the ash tree carries with it the notion of barrenness.
  • A tall ash tree stood out from the rest of the trees that lined the crumbling brick wall, letters carved deeply into the trunk.
1.1 [mass noun] The hard pale wood of the ash tree.
Example sentences
  • All products are made of three types of wood: ash from the US, beech from Germany and sapele from Africa.
  • Look for wooden handles made out of ash or hickory wood.
  • Using thorn, apple and pear woods for heads and ash for the shafts, Philip mastered his craft, revolutionising play with shapes that, literally, broke the mould.
1.2Used in names of trees unrelated to the ash but with similar leaves, e.g. mountain ash.
Example sentences
  • Brilliant bigtooth maple, velvet ash, and box elder leaves float on mirror-smooth pools and stick to hiking boots.
2An Old English runic letter, ᚫ, a vowel intermediate between a and e. It is represented in the Roman alphabet by the symbol æ or Æ (see also Æ).
[so named from the word of which it was the first letter]

Origin

Old English æsc, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch es and German Esche.

More
  • The two meanings of ash, the powder and the tree, started out as two completely different words. In Old English aesce or aexe referred to the powder, and aesc referred to the tree. When something turns to ashes in your mouth it becomes bitterly disappointing or worthless. The origins of this phrase can be traced back to John de Mandeville's Travels, a 14th-century work claiming to be an account of the author's travels in the East, where there is a description of a legendary fruit known as the Dead Sea fruit, sometimes also called the apple of Sodom. Although the fruit was appetizing to look at, it dissolved into smoke and ashes as soon as anyone tried to eat it The name of the Ashes, the cricket competition played roughly every other year between England and Australia comes from a mock obituary notice published in the Sporting Times newspaper on 2 September 1882, after the Australians had sensationally beaten the English team at the Oval: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of English Cricket Which Died at the Oval on 29th August, 1882. Deeply lamented by a large circle of sorrowing friends and acquaintances. R.I.P. N.B.—The body will be cremated and the ashes taken to Australia.’ During the subsequent 1882–3 Test series in Australia the captain of the English team declared that his mission was to recover the Ashes for England. During the tour a group of women presented him with a wooden urn containing the ashes of a bail or stump, which has since been kept at Lord's Cricket Ground.

Definition of ash in:

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There are 3 main definitions of ash in English:

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ASH3

Line breaks: ASH

abbreviation

(In the UK) Action on Smoking and Health.

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