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aspire

Line breaks: as¦pire
Pronunciation: /əˈspʌɪə
 
/

Definition of aspire in English:

verb

[no object]
1Direct one’s hopes or ambitions towards achieving something: we never thought that we might aspire to those heights [with infinitive]: other people will aspire to be like you
More example sentences
  • It stirs us to strive for the goal, achieve the target and aspire to something beyond our comfort zone.
  • We need to ask ourselves, what kind of success do we aspire to achieve and at what cost?
  • What counts most is what each individual can aspire to achieve with technology and the results they deliver.
Synonyms
desire (to), aim for/to, hope for/to, long for/to, yearn for/to, hanker after/for/to, set one's heart on, wish for/to, want (to), expect (to), have the objective of, dream of, hunger for/to, seek (to), pursue, have as one's goal/aim, set one's sights on;
be ambitious
literary thirst for/after
archaic be desirous of
would-be, intending, aspirant, hopeful, optimistic, budding, wishful;
potential, possible, prospective, likely, future;
ambitious, eager, keen, striving, determined, enterprising, pioneering, progressive, motivated, driven, enthusiastic, energetic, zealous, committed, go-ahead, go-getting, purposeful
informal wannabe, on the make
archaic expectant
2 literary Rise high; tower: above the domes of loftiest mosques these pinnacles aspire

Origin

late Middle English: from French aspirer or Latin aspirare, from ad- 'to' + spirare 'breathe'.

More
  • spirit from (Middle English):

    Our word spirit is based on Latin spiritus ‘breath or spirit’, from spirare ‘to breathe’—the ancient Romans believed that the human soul had been ‘breathed’ into the body—the image is the same as ‘the breath of life’. The sense ‘strong distilled alcoholic drink’ comes from the use in alchemy of spirit to mean ‘a liquid essence extracted from some substance’. People sometimes say the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak when they have good intentions but yield to temptation and fail to live up to them. The source is the New Testament, where Jesus uses the phrase after finding his disciples asleep in the Garden of Gethsemane despite telling them that they should stay awake. Spirare forms the basis of numerous English words including aspire (mid 16th century) from adspirare ‘to breath upon, seek to reach’; conspire (Late Middle English) from conspirare ‘to breath together, agree’; expire (late 16th century) ‘to breath out’; inspire (Late Middle English) ‘breath into’ from the idea that a divine or outside power has inspired you; and perspire (mid 17th century) ‘to breath through’; and transpire (Late Middle English) ‘breath across. In English spirit was shortened to sprite (Middle English) which in turn developed sprightly (late 16th century).

Definition of aspire in:

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Pronunciation: snɑːf
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eat or drink quickly or greedily