Definition of attitude in English:

attitude

Line breaks: at¦ti|tude
Pronunciation: /ˈatɪtjuːd
 
/

noun

1A settled way of thinking or feeling about something: he was questioned on his attitude to South Africa being competitive is an attitude of mind
More example sentences
  • Public opinion and the public attitude to war is often a key to whether there will be a war in the first place.
  • A sensitive attitude to cultural differences is necessary if the alliance is to succeed.
  • It reminded me of how much we're complete opposites when it comes to our attitude to public transport.
Synonyms
point of view, view, viewpoint, vantage point, frame of mind, way of thinking, way of looking at things, school of thought, outlook, angle, slant, perspective, reaction, stance, standpoint, position, inclination, orientation, approach; opinion, ideas, belief, convictions, feelings, sentiments, persuasion, thoughts, thinking, interpretation
1.1A position of the body indicating a particular mental state: the boy was standing in an attitude of despair
More example sentences
  • His stocky body was set in an attitude of hopeless challenge.
  • Plus, this healthy physical attitude of yours indicates deeper emotional well-being and stability.
  • Three plump blackbirds, made all the plumper by the cold-weather attitude of their feathers, sat in a ragged row.
Synonyms
1.2 Ballet A position in which one leg is lifted behind with the knee bent at right angles and turned out, and the corresponding arm is raised above the head, the other extended to the side.
More example sentences
  • The women hobble and stretch on point, doing something looking like an attitude, the knee isn't raised, but the leg stretches out from the knee.
  • The dancers could not be faulted for they rendered their attitudes, tours and pirouettes with steady, professional manner.
2 [mass noun] informal , chiefly North American Truculent or uncooperative behaviour: I asked the waiter for a clean fork and all I got was attitude
More example sentences
  • Staff have an attitude and can't even raise a smile when you tip them!
  • She came to his studio with attitude, but cradled his face in her hands to kiss him before she left.
  • Last season they arrived with attitude and generally did not treat us well, making fun of us even though they are not very good themselves.
2.1Individuality and self-confidence: she snapped her fingers with attitude
More example sentences
  • Sarah pointed at a nine-year-old girl with attitude and spunk.
  • So, I thought, it's just a bar with attitude.
  • She comes across as sweet and innocent and yet as a teen with attitude.
3The orientation of an aircraft or spacecraft, relative to the direction of travel.
More example sentences
  • Although the pilot cannot deliberately overshoot the attitude limitation, the aircraft can.
  • It is important to fully understand the effect a liquid's movement can have on the attitude control of these spacecraft.
  • We use our view of the ground, the horizon and the sky to keep the airplane in the right attitude.

Origin

late 17th century (denoting the placing or posture of a figure in art): from French, from Italian attitudine 'fitness, posture', from late Latin aptitudo, from aptus 'fit'.

Derivatives

attitudinal

Pronunciation: /atɪˈtjuːdɪn(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • An attitudinal change will have to be brought about.
  • This attitudinal shift has diffused the tension over lesbianism in women's sport although it has not totally removed it.
  • The first survey posed certain abstract questions about principles, and the answers will reflect attitudinal preferences.

Definition of attitude in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day humoresque
Pronunciation: ˌhjuːməˈrɛsk
noun
a short, lively piece of music