Definition of attraction in English:

attraction

Line breaks: at|trac¦tion
Pronunciation: /əˈtrakʃ(ə)n
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1The action or power of evoking interest in or liking for someone or something: the timeless attraction of a good tune she has very romantic ideas about sexual attraction
More example sentences
  • Platonic love is devoid of any physical attraction or sexual interest.
  • These can express everything from sexual attraction to intellectual or physical dominance.
  • No, it was probably only baseless physical, sexual attraction.
Synonyms
1.1 [count noun] A quality or feature that evokes interest, liking, or desire: this reform has many attractions for those on the left
More example sentences
  • He believes colour and convenience are the main attractions for beginner or novice gardeners buying plants.
  • The quality of the workforce is one of the attractions for entrepreneurs and investors in the Paisley area.
  • One of the main attractions for users to have mobile phones is that they offer the ability to roam and to make telephone calls from almost anywhere.
1.2 [count noun] A place which draws visitors by providing something of interest or pleasure: the church is the town’s main tourist attraction
More example sentences
  • There are ambitious plans for the future and the entire park, when fully developed, will be a tourist attraction for locals and visitors alike.
  • In many towns and villages, such a house acts not only as a place to live, but also as a tourist attraction, bringing visitors in their droves.
  • Sligo Folk Park is the latest regional visitor and tourist attraction in the County.
Synonyms
entertainment, activity, diversion, interest, feature, crowd-pleaser
1.3 Physics A force under the influence of which objects tend to move towards each other: gravitational attraction
More example sentences
  • As an exercise you might try computing the electrostatic attraction between an electron and a proton and compare it with the gravitational attraction.
  • Gravitational forces of attraction always exist between two objects of any mass, but it takes an object as large as a planet for this force to become noticeable.
  • The gravitational attraction between the two might follow a force law that differs from Newton's law of gravity.
Synonyms
1.4 Grammar The influence exerted by one word on another which causes it to change to an incorrect form, e.g. the wages of sin is (for are) death.

Origin

late Middle English (denoting the action of a poultice in drawing matter from the tissues): from Latin attractio(n-), from the verb attrahere (see attract).

Definition of attraction in:

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