Definition of augur in English:

augur

Line breaks: augur
Pronunciation: /ˈɔːgə
 
/

verb

[no object] (augur well/badly/ill)

noun

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Derivatives

augural

Pronunciation: /ˈɔːgjʊ(ə)r(ə)l/
adjective ( • archaic )
More example sentences
  • The statue clearly indicates that Marsyas, the teacher of augural practice of auspices, arrived in Italy from Asia Minor.
  • Why, we might ask, would the Princeps desire to eliminate any traces of the traditional augural function of this minor deity?

Origin

late Middle English (as a noun): from Latin, 'diviner'.

Usage

The spellings augur (a verb meaning ‘portend a good or bad outcome’, as in this augurs well ) and auger (a type of tool used for boring) are sometimes confused, but the two words are quite different in both their present meaning and their origins.

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