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avocado

Line breaks: avo|cado
Pronunciation: /ˌavəˈkɑːdəʊ
 
/

Definition of avocado in English:

noun (plural avocados)

1 (British also avocado pear) A pear-shaped fruit with a rough leathery skin and smooth, oily edible flesh: a salad of avocados and oranges [mass noun]: serve with slices of avocado Also called alligator pear.
More example sentences
  • Vegetables and fruits are very expensive with an avocado pear in town centre costing K2,500 instead of K500 in Ndola.
  • My other favourite foods include avocado pear, bananas, pears, oranges, grapes and walnuts, when they are in season.
  • For a further #5 fruit selection, I had four each red apples, William pears, bananas, an avocado and a lemon.
1.1 [mass noun] A light green colour like that of the flesh of avocados.
Example sentences
  • The shirt I got was lime green and avocado with three-quarter length sleeves.
  • This week I'm staying out of the kitchen because I spent most of last week there, scraping the remains of the geometric patterned avocado green carpet off of the linoleum tiles underneath.
  • I particularly remember the jaunt to buy a motorized exercise/torture device which came in the required shade of avocado green.
2The tropical evergreen tree which bears the avocado fruit, native to Central America and widely cultivated elsewhere.
  • Persea americana, family Lauraceae
Example sentences
  • These include exotic ylang ylang, jasmine, turmeric, ginger, allspice, cinnamon, curry leaf, water lilies, mahogany trees, avocados, wax apples, and five varieties of mango.
  • Even as it matures, the tropical avocado will never be able to take unusually low temperatures.
  • There was an apple tree and an avocado in the front yard, surrounded by thick St. Augustine grass.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Spanish, alteration (influenced by avocado 'advocate') of aguacate, from Nahuatl ahuacatl.

More
  • The name of the avocado in the Aztec language Nahuatl was ahuacatl, also the word for ‘testicle’ and applied to the fruit because of its shape. In the 16th century the Spanish conquerors of Central America adopted this word but converted it into the form aguacate and then to the more familiar-sounding avocado, the Spanish word for ‘a lawyer’ (and related to the English advocate, see advocaat). The word came into English in the mid 17th century.

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