There are 2 definitions of bach in English:

bach1

Line breaks: bach

noun

Welsh
  • Used as a term of endearment, often after a personal name: Thomas bach, you are looking tired

Origin

Welsh, literally 'little'.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kəːf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 2 definitions of bach in English:

bach2

Line breaks: bach
Pronunciation: /batʃ
 
/
informal

verb

[no object] Australian /NZ
  • (Especially of a man) live alone and do one’s own cooking and housekeeping: Baldy bached in a hut down the road a bit
    More example sentences
    • At first Joe bached in an old house on the farm, but later built a new house doing most of the building himself.
    • It must have been the first Saturday that we were left ‘baching‘.
    • Keith refers to their time in the house as ‘baching’, although he was only 16-and-a-half at the time.

noun

NZ Back to top  
  • A small holiday house.
    More example sentences
    • Removal of the baches was required under the North Canterbury Conservation Board's 1998 plan for the reserve.
    • I have also heard, and certainly saw on our boat trip in, that there are many privately owned baches which can be rented.
    • The seaside baches have become a lot bigger and more posh in the last 50 years than they used to be, and cost a lot more to buy.

Origin

late 19th century (as a verb): abbreviation of bachelor.