Definition of bash in English:

bash

Line breaks: bash
Pronunciation: /baʃ
 
/
informal

verb

[with object]
  • 1Strike hard and violently: she bashed him with the book [no object]: people bashed on the doors
    More example sentences
    • I had forgot how much fun bashing the drums really hard is.
    • At the moment the keys on the piano are bashed rather hard.
    • Keep your eye on these hooks: sometimes even their incredibly sharp points can bend over when the current bashes them against hard rocks.
    Synonyms
    strike, hit, beat, thump, slap, smack, batter, pound, pummel, thrash, rap, buffet, hammer, bang, knock
    informal wallop, belt, whack, clout, clip, clobber, bop, biff, sock, deck, swipe, lay one on
  • 1.1 (bash something in) Damage or break something by striking it violently: the car’s rear window had been bashed in
    More example sentences
    • Neighborhood vandals and our own children bashed our windows in with rocks.
    • There was a police car on the flower bed, and its head was bashed in with the word ‘Police’ dented.
    • Jimmy's bashing my head in with a two-by-four!
  • 1.2 [no object] (bash into) Collide with: the other vehicle bashed into the back of them
    More example sentences
    • I asked, just as I though would happen, something came bashing into my head; knocking me over, chair and all.
    • But he chased after me and my clothes got torn, and we were barely out of his father's car when this truck came out of nowhere and bashed into it and knocked it over the hill.
    • The suspension gets a bit of a hammering and there's always a danger of a truck or something bashing into you.
    Synonyms
  • 1.3Fiercely criticize or oppose: the dispute will be used as an excuse to bash the unions
    More example sentences
    • Critics also bashed the law for limiting access to information and privacy.
    • Critics who bash such films as Happy Times as being heavy-handed misinterpret the key differences between Eastern and Western cinema.
    • The critics who bash Harrington the most tend to overlook the problems Detroit has had with its passing game since his arrival.

noun

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  • 2A party or social event: a birthday bash
    More example sentences
    • New York Social Diary is your link to the parties, events, openings, launches, shindigs, bashes, and general social whirlwind that is the East Coast social scene.
    • The event was a birthday bash for KIK Corp. supremo and new Toronto Argonauts owner David Cynamon, who chartered the Air Canada jet.
    • My birthday party was a joint bash with a good friend from College, the English Civil War Historian.
  • 3 [in singular] British An attempt: have a bash at this quiz
    More example sentences
    • Their amazing efforts started in June 2004 when the group decided to have a bash at breaking the record £10,000 previously raised by doing so.
    • So do have a bash at it, even if you're not 100% confident of your answers.
    • I'd like to have a bash at playing Gustav von Aschenbach in Death In Venice, please.

Phrasal verbs

bash something out

Produce something rapidly without preparation or attention to detail: I didn’t just want to bash out songs
More example sentences
  • I used to bash them out on a manual typewriter, photocopy them and distribute.
  • No time wasted with string sections or French-horn charts here - once Roberts has the song in his head, he just wants to bash it out.
  • As far as melodies and lyrics are concerned, I think Andy was happy for me to bash things out and then give an opinion or advice on how things might progress, which was important.

bash on (or away)

British Continue despite difficulties: nothing much we can do, except bash on
More example sentences
  • What about bands that don't even advertise. There could be some great unsigned band just bashing away in some pub somewhere in London tonight.
  • That's a bit insulting to those of us bashing away for the consumer week in, week out.
  • Paulo Costanzo is welcome and again bashes away excellently at the banter.

Derivatives

basher

noun
More example sentences
  • And it has become all too easy to dismiss youngsters as a bunch of self-centred, anti-social, potential granny bashers.
  • I'm not a professional BBC basher, but the corporation really needs to be called to account on this one.
  • Now don't get me wrong I'm not a man basher, I've just never come across an intuitive one.

Origin

mid 17th century (as a verb): imitative, perhaps a blend of bang1 and smash, dash, etc..

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