There are 3 main definitions of bat in English:

bat1

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noun

1An implement with a handle and a solid surface, typically of wood, used for hitting the ball in games such as cricket, baseball, and table tennis: [with modifier]: a cricket bat
More example sentences
  • Well, it turns out nobody officially tests balls hit by aluminum bats under game conditions.
  • There is no evidence of an ancestor of Billiards prior to this time, unless you do lower your criteria to count all the other games played with bats, balls and skittles.
  • He generates the best bat speed in the game and hits balls harder than any other batter.
1.1A turn at playing with a bat.
More example sentences
  • The first was left and the second caused a defensive prod in the middle of the bat, bringing loud applause from the crowd.
  • Ironically, in our innings we only called upon three of our bats.
  • But we didn't start well with the bat, and there wasn't enough hardness in the middle order.
1.2A person batting, especially in cricket; a batsman: the team’s opening bat
More example sentences
  • Schenke is an opening left-handed bat and right arm medium pace bowler from Sydney's Balmain Club.
  • He was as solid as his father and as stolid as his uncle Sadiq: an opening bat who could bowl a useful off-break.
  • Does any other team have opening bats who spend more of their time swishing at flies outside the off stump?
1.3Each of a pair of objects resembling table tennis bats, used by a person on the ground to guide a taxiing aircraft.
More example sentences
  • Gliders were retrieved to the launch point by 15cwt Bedford trucks and instructions to the winch driver, a thousand yards away, were given by semaphore bats.
  • This being secure, the wings are leveled by the crew, one crew on the wing, one to hold the tail down (keep the skid off the runway) and one to operate the signal bat, which signals the tow vehicle.
  • All of the manuals reviewed as part of the investigation stated that marshalling bats should be used to minimise the risk of misinterpretation.
1.4A slab on which pottery is formed, dried, or fired.
More example sentences
  • The wet clay piece is left on the bat; the bat is removed from the wheel head; and the piece remains on the masonite bat for quick drying.
  • Simply lift up and the bat will come off the wheel-head without any struggle.
  • Put the bat, bat side up on a banding wheel and cut off excessive foam with the electric knife.

verb (bats, batting, batted)

[no object] Back to top  
1(Of a sports team or player) take the role of hitting rather than throwing the ball: Australia reached 263 for 4 after choosing to bat
More example sentences
  • We almost got out of the inning on our own, but mercifully, the other team had batted through the lineup, which meant it was our turn to bat.
  • Frankly, the team batted worse than it did in the first innings at Lahore.
  • The Indian team batted perfectly, bowled like champions and fielded like tigers.
1.1 (bat for (or go to bat for)) informal , chiefly North American Defend the interests of; support: she turned out to have the law batting for her
More example sentences
  • There is always something unnerving about the news media going into bat for their own interests; the moral fervour precludes argument.
  • And in the past there have been situations where I have had to go into bat for her and defend her when I have brought her out with these friends.
  • You talked about there being sketches that you had to really go to bat for.
2 [with object and adverbial of direction] Hit at (someone or something) with the flat of one’s hand: he batted the flies away
More example sentences
  • Laurie put the small box down on a flat rock and teasingly batted Gil's hand away as he knelt down and tried to reach inside for a sandwich.
  • She was beckoning to me, looking around anxiously, and I was batting people out of the way, but as I approached I saw her look up at someone beside her.
  • I pushed through them like I was running through some forest batting the tree limbs out of the way.

Origin

late Old English batt 'club, stick, staff', perhaps partly from Old French batte, from battre 'to strike'.

Phrases

bat a thousand

US informal
Be very successful; achieve perfection: with tortellini in brodo, I batted a thousand—both kids had seconds
More example sentences
  • Voss knows he's batting a thousand with his marketing efforts with each new customer who walks in the door.
  • Rarely does a film get everything right, but The Hit manages to bat a thousand in just about every category.
  • And Mother Nature always bats last, and she always bats a thousand.

off one's own bat

British At one’s own instigation; spontaneously: when he didn’t chase the dog she came back off her own bat
More example sentences
  • I'm betting you wouldn't consider, off your own bat, changing the tyres, adding a turbo charger, adding a stereo or messing about with the engine, even if you know what you're doing, and even more so if you don't.
  • And the politicians did not do it off their own bat, they were elected to do it.
  • I haven't invested in any shares off my own bat, though, mainly because I don't know what I'm talking about.

right off the bat

North American At the very beginning; straight away: I managed to have a disagreement with him right off the bat
More example sentences
  • Installation is straightforward, and right off the bat, you got your options on how to setup the graphics.
  • I'm not just gonna take them straight to the best spots right off the bat.
  • I know this is a scam right off the bat, because I'm not anyone's employee.

Phrasal verbs

bat around (or about)

informal , chiefly North American Travel widely, frequently, or casually: I’m always batting around between England and America
More example sentences
  • Obviously, as we have kind of batted around endlessly, they're looking for evidence in that truck.
  • He was an English immigrant who batted around the United States in a random fashion until in 1876 he sold the Atchinson, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad on the idea of opening clean and wholesome restaurants at their rail depots.
  • Why couldn't I get a van and bat around the country doing whatever it is I do?

bat something around (or about)

informal Discuss an idea or proposal casually or idly: we bat around a wide variety of issues
More example sentences
  • Imagination projects are managed, in part, through weekly meetings - meetings in which ideas are batted around, problems are raised, and progress on deadlines is assessed.
  • For a couple of hours different ideas were batted around to see how strong they were, but none stood up to Jen's standards.
  • It's been nice batting ideas around with you.

Definition of bat in:

There are 3 main definitions of bat in English:

bat2

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noun

1A mainly nocturnal mammal capable of sustained flight, with membranous wings that extend between the fingers and limbs.
More example sentences
  • Small and furry, bats are the only mammals to have achieved powered flight.
  • The placental mammals include such diverse forms as whales, bats, elephants, shrews, and armadillos.
  • Nearly a quarter of all mammal species are bats, and they are the only winged animals in the class Mammalia.
2 (usually old bat) informal A woman regarded as unattractive or unpleasant: some deranged old bat
[from bat, a slang term for 'prostitute', or from battleaxe]
More example sentences
  • But then the old bat did go on a bit - 30 minutes of complaining after the effect when last night she could have just asked us to quiet down and then have had no cause for complaint.
  • So how's about you head over there right this very second and wish the old bat a happy birthday, hmmm?
  • Ok, now that I've put that side of her character in perspective, you must be wondering why I like the old bat?

Origin

late 16th century: alteration, perhaps by association with medieval Latin batta, blacta, of Middle English bakke, of Scandinavian origin.

Phrases

have bats in the (or one's) belfry

informal Be eccentric or mad: I’m goofy, I’m daft, there’s bats in my belfry
More example sentences
  • It looks like I have bats in my belfry with that Halloween decoration hanging on the guillotine.
  • The man obviously had bats in his belfry for making such a ludicrous statement.
  • The rumor is that Maggie has bats in her belfry?

like a bat out of hell

informal Very fast and wildly: he was driving like a bat out of hell like a bat out of hell he flung himself at the man
More example sentences
  • The first step is to get down to the Old Port, onto the bike path that runs alongside the Lachine Canal and head west like a bat out of hell - or a meandering tortoise, if you prefer.
  • It's pretty great, actually, from a certain perspective. I mean, it starts going like a bat out of hell, and keeps accelerating.
  • I threw his t-shirt back in his face, got back in my car, and drove home like a bat out of hell, screaming the whole way.

Definition of bat in:

There are 3 main definitions of bat in English:

bat3

Line breaks: bat

verb (bats, batting, batted)

[with object]
Flutter (one’s eyelashes), typically in a flirtatious manner: she batted her long dark eyelashes at him
More example sentences
  • She was batting her eyelashes at Rick in an extremely flirtatious manner.
  • She batted her eyelashes in the most flirtatious manner she could muster.
  • To Todd she spoke more flirtatiously, batting her eyelashes and pressing up against the locker next to his.

Origin

late 19th century (originally US): from dialect and US bat 'to wink, blink', variant of obsolete bate 'to flutter'.

Phrases

not bat (or without batting) an eyelid (or North American eye or eyelash)

informal Show (or showing) no surprise or concern: she paid the bill without batting an eyelid
More example sentences
  • But to my surprise, the kids didn't bat an eyelid.
  • When I say they didn't bat an eyelid, I'm not exaggerating because I was looking at them.
  • MacGyver, err… our driver, didn't bat an eye despite our extensive arm waving.

Definition of bat in: