There are 2 definitions of bate in English:

bate1

Line breaks: bate
Pronunciation: /beɪt
 
/
(also bait)

noun

[in singular] British informal , • dated
  • An angry mood: he got into a stinking bate
    More example sentences
    • Shrieking with simulated frustration, Clarkson flew into a bate, picked up a hammer and smashed his desktop to smithereens.
    • Rusty gets into a bate if left indoors for too long, and the last time his owner disappeared for a session in the pub, he opened a cupboard and ate three packs of biscuits, and chewed the sofa right down to the wood.
    • On the other hand, when you hear of a plan to build a much-needed rail link under your London studios, you fly into a bate and object in writing.

Origin

mid 19th century: from the verb bait 'torment', expressing the notion 'state of a baited person'.

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Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmeɪlstrəm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea

There are 2 definitions of bate in English:

bate2

Line breaks: bate
Pronunciation: /beɪt
 
/

verb

[no object] Falconry
  • (Of a hawk) beat the wings in agitation and flutter off the perch: the hawks bated and immediately the breeze got in their feathers
    More example sentences
    • And if your hawk bates, that's flies off the fist in a temper, you're going to need that hand to help her back on again.
    • Its eyes glowed golden, and the hawk bated suddenly.
    • When the hawk bated, the volunteer explained that he was mad and provided passive resistance.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French batre 'to beat' (see also batter1).

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Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmeɪlstrəm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea