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bench

Line breaks: bench
Pronunciation: /bɛn(t)ʃ
 
/

Definition of bench in English:

noun

1A long seat for several people, typically made of wood or stone: a park bench
More example sentences
  • Mr Buttery wants to make more of the site, now barely more than a couple of park benches and an engraved stone.
  • Looms, beds, tables, chairs, stools and benches were made of wood as well.
  • Once outside, I took a seat on a stone bench near the door.
Synonyms
pew, form, long seat, seat, stall, settle
2A long work table in a workshop or laboratory: a 19th-century wheelwright’s bench
More example sentences
  • This street-roof is studded with glass lenses that shine daylight down to laboratory benches below.
  • I can envisage these pages being photocopied and pinned above laboratory benches around the world.
  • In Downie's day, smallpox work was done on wooden benches in the open laboratory.
Synonyms
3A judge’s seat in a law court.
Example sentences
  • You know I always wonder about the kind of people who sit on these judges benches and pass judgment over people.
  • The mock-up design featured access by ramps to all raised spaces, including the judge's bench, witness stand, jury box, and clerk stations.
  • In an unprecedented move Magistrate Nicholas got up from the bench and sat at the bar table with the witness and the accused.
3.1 (the bench) The office of judge or magistrate: his appointment to the civil bench
More example sentences
  • Before joining the bench, the Judge was a law professor who was well known for his erudite criticism of legalized abortion.
  • A Leyland magistrate is being forced to retire from the bench against his will because he is too old!
  • However, there are some people who move from the academic field to practice or the bench.
3.2A judge or magistrate presiding over a particular case.
Example sentences
  • Scotland's Lord Justice General recently presided over the bench of five senior judges who heard and ruled on the Lockerbie appeal.
  • Another bench of Magistrates may, reasonable and rationally, have reached the decision that the appeal should have been dismissed.
  • The sessions will take place at Bradford Magistrates Court in front of a specialised bench of magistrates and a prosecutor, who will be experts in ASBOs.
Synonyms
4British A long seat in Parliament for politicians of a specified party: the Conservative benches
More example sentences
  • To achieve this, a precondition is that we should have greater diversity on our Parliamentary benches and in our Party as a whole.
  • Opposition to the government comes from the parties that sit on the Opposition benches in Parliament.
  • One of the odder aspects of the parliament's back benches is how little flexibility there is within the committee system.
4.1The politicians occupying a specified bench in Parliament: the pledge that was given by the Opposition benches yesterday
More example sentences
  • The Labour leadership has badly let down its back benches and the electorate by undoing its accomplished manifesto promise, now they stand for nothing.
  • This has come from the opposition benches in Parliament, the independence movement in Quebec and the general public as well as the arts community itself.
  • Dr. Singh, who has just returned from his four-day visit to Japan, is expected to dispel some of the concerns raised by the Opposition bench and the Left party, supporting his government.
5 (the bench) A seat at the side of a sports field for coaches, substitutes, and players not taking part in a game: he must settle for a place on the substitute’s bench
More example sentences
  • When a timeout is called, players stroll to the bench and coaches hustle to huddle.
  • The next season, he was back on the field as the bench coach for new Cleveland manager.
  • First-choice half back Sean Long endured a nightmare first half at the JJB and should be relegated to the bench when coach David Waite names his side today.
6A flat ledge in masonry or on sloping ground.
Example sentences
  • Emphasis is taken from the towering edifice and transferred to the ledges, curbs, benches and other ground-level surfaces that surround it.
  • From the boxes to the benches high up the slope, the focus shifts from dinner to music as the concert begins.
  • Now on a broad bench, we followed it around to the right, going through a tunnel with snow.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Exhibit (a dog) at a show: Affenpinschers and Afghans were benched side by side
[from the practice of exhibiting dogs on benches]
More example sentences
  • In 1888, additional safeguards were added, with the requirement for a “duly qualified veterinary surgeon to be at every show,” and each dog entered had to be passed on by him before being benched, and again he had to inspect each dog before noon of each day the show was open.
  • All dogs entered by an owner/exhibitor or agent/handler can be benched together.
  • About 850 dogs were benched under the canvas, many of them champions of their respective breeds.
2North American Withdraw (a sports player) from play: the coach benched quarterback Cunningham in favour of McMahon
More example sentences
  • One reason benching players is so detrimental to team play is that it eventually fractures unity.
  • You have a certain amount of discipline points for the year - with discipline always being a matter of benching a player.
  • The team has tried switching personnel, blitzing more often and benching players.
3 short for bench-press. he benched almost 500 pounds
More example sentences
  • He's got the long-hair, the ripped clothing, and he can bench 200 pounds.
  • He's now up to about 240 pounds and benching about 170.
  • He was benching 310 pounds like it was nobody's business.

Origin

Old English benc, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch bank and German Bank, also to bank1.

More
  • bank from (Middle English):

    The very different uses of bank are all ultimately related. The bank beside a river was adopted from a Scandinavian word in the early Middle Ages, and is related to bench (Old English). The earliest use of the bank for a financial institution referred to a money-dealer's counter or table. This came from French or Italian in the late 15th century, but goes back to the same root as the river bank. A bank of oars or of lights represents yet another related form. It came into English in the early Middle Ages from French, and originally meant a bench or a platform to speak from. The bench or platform sense is also found in mountebank (late 16th century) for a charlatan, which comes from Italian monta in banco ‘climb on the bench’ referring to the way they attract a crowd, while a bankrupt (mid 16th century), originally a bankrout takes us back to the ‘counter’ sense. It is from Italian banca rotta, which really means ‘a broken bench’, referring to the breaking up of the traders business at the counter. The word was altered early on in its history in English, through association with Latin ruptus ‘broken’. Yet another word from the same source is banquet (Late Middle English) which comes from the French for ‘little bench’ and was originally a snack rather than a lavish meal.

Phrases

on the bench

1
1Appointed as or in the capacity of a judge or magistrate: he retired after twenty-five years on the bench
More example sentences
  • The female magistrate had sat on the bench at the applicant's trial for escaping lawful custody.
  • That two of five judges on the bench thought otherwise should be chilling enough.
  • Frank worked long hours as a Judge hence his massive output of work on the bench.
2Acting as one of the possible substitutes in a sports match: Robson will again be on the bench
More example sentences
  • When Charlton's season kicked off at the Reebok stadium, the three were all on the bench as substitutes.
  • York Wasps coach Garry Atkins said today that Forsyth will start tomorrow's match on the bench.
  • There must be a time when you have to call it a day, and I don't think I would like to spend the last few matches on the bench.

Definition of bench in:

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