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betide

Line breaks: be¦tide
Pronunciation: /bɪˈtʌɪd
 
/

Definition of betide in English:

verb

[no object] literary
1Happen: I waited with beating heart, not knowing what would betide
More example sentences
  • A terrific night for the young and young at heart Simon promised he'd be back to Carlow and judging by the wild celebrations of his Carlow fans - woe betide if he isn't!
  • Woe betide if you use flash during a performance - it's off-putting to other audience members and most of all, tot he performers.
  • Well, I'm still scared, but woe betide if I dare admit it out loud.
Synonyms
North American informal go down
1.1 [with object] Happen to (someone): she was trembling with fear lest worse might betide her
More example sentences
  • Woe betide the person who doesn't cut back their overhanging vegetation as it severely compromises the safety of tall pedestrians with hats who use a particular footpath to mass.
  • But there is an unnerving element to the intensity of his devotion to the cause, as if those teeth glint with a shark-like quality, and woe betide the person who gets in the way of that hurry.
  • Armed with an exact list of what is to be bought, off we set, and woe betide the person who wanders in front of us as Mistress P beats a direct path to the chosen store.

Origin

Middle English: from be- (as an intensifier) + obsolete tide 'befall', from Old English tīdan 'happen', from tīd (see tide).

More
  • woe from (Old English):

    Many ancient languages, including Old English, Latin, and Greek, had woe or a similar word—a natural exclamation made by someone unhappy or in distress. The medieval word betide, meaning ‘to happen’, comes from the same source as tide, and these days is mainly found in the phrase woe betide, a light-hearted warning that a person will be in trouble if they do a particular thing.

Phrases

woe betide

1
see woe.

Definition of betide in:

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