Definition of bolt-on in English:

bolt-on

Line breaks: bolt-on

adjective

  • 1(Of an extra part of a machine) able to be fastened on with a bolt or catch: a bolt-on accessory available for most 35 mm SLRs
    More example sentences
    • The upscale LX trim level adds color-keyed bodyside molding, bolt-on wheel covers, a passenger-side vanity mirror, a cargo cover for the wagon, and upgraded upholstery.
    • The bolt-on stereo speakers are surprisingly good.
    • The new car also has bolt-on end structures to reduce both the time and cost of crash repair.
  • 1.1Denoting a feature, service, etc. that has been or can be added to an existing arrangement: there’s no obligation to buy any type of bolt-on insurance product with a personal loan
    More example sentences
    • Industry specialists also advise clients to be sceptical about expensive and unnecessary products which lenders and brokers may try to sell you as bolt-on products to the basic mortgage loan.
    • The team also produces bespoke bolt-on software for designers.
    • Extracurricular activities tend to be a very important and integral part of what they have to offer, rather than a bolt-on extra.

noun

Back to top  
  • 1A bolt-on part of a machine: the bike’s bolt-ons were worth more than the asking price
    More example sentences
    • This Beetle's body features a ton of new trim and factory-fresh bolt-ons.
    • Built off a 1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible, it featured genuinely interesting bodywork and some wild engine bolt-ons.
    • Included with the sale is the car's original owner's manual and some detailed component manuals for the aftermarket bolt-ons.
  • 1.1A bolt-on feature, service, etc.: some network operators offer bolt-ons to help cut the cost of data usage abroad
    More example sentences
    • More students are taking language courses, particularly in newly popular subjects such as Spanish - but it is now often a subsidiary bolt-on to another degree subject.
    • To access the technology runners will need to have handset with a GPS network, which is already fitted on many new mobiles or can be purchased as a bolt-on for as little as £40.
    • He will probably not treat aesthetics as a bolt-on, recognising that it's a must-have in the current market.

More definitions of bolt-on

Definition of bolt-on in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space