There are 3 definitions of boom in English:

boom1

Line breaks: boom
Pronunciation: /buːm
 
/

noun

1A loud, deep, resonant sound: the deep boom of the bass drum
More example sentences
  • There was a deep boom, then the sound of rending metal and breaking glass, and still it didn't stop.
  • I heard someone yell as a loud boom sounded behind them.
  • As they drew closer to Sara's there was a loud boom and a cracking sound.
Synonyms
1.1The characteristic resonant cry of the bittern: the boom of the bittern may be enjoyed in the country
More example sentences
  • And Doncaster will hopefully soon be ringing with the boom of bitterns crying out for mates.
  • He reported that bitterns were beginning to practise their boom on the reserve again but would not find their full voice until April or May.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1Make a loud, deep, resonant sound: thunder boomed in the sky
More example sentences
  • A loud sound boomed out like that of a giant bell, when one is inside it.
  • A chime from somewhere deep inside the Sanctuary boomed out seven deep notes: fifteen minutes to the next class.
  • Suddenly, I heard the sound of thunder booming all about outside.
Synonyms
reverberate, resound, resonate; rumble, thunder, ring out, sound loudly, blare, echo, fill the air; crack, crash, roll, clap, explode, bang, blast
1.1 [with direct speech] Say in a loud, deep, resonant voice: ‘Stop right there,’ boomed the Headmaster
More example sentences
  • ‘Kaseios,’ his loud voice boomed across the hall, just like it used to, and Euthenas was no longer terrified, but comforted.
  • ‘She was a wonderful, beautiful ambitious woman and she will be missed,’ his deep voice boomed between sobs.
  • ‘You killed my best friend,’ the shadow boomed in a deep voice.
Synonyms
bellow, roar, thunder, shout, bawl, yell, bark
North American informal holler
1.2(Of a bittern) utter its characteristic resonant cry: a dozen bitterns boom mysteriously from the reeds
More example sentences
  • The date of the first booming bitterns varies each year, although there has been a trend towards them starting to boom earlier in recent years.
  • There is a sexual bias in that only male Great Bitterns boom; we have no data on the survival of adult females.
  • Leighton Moss, a premier RSPB reserve where you can hear bitterns boom, is a lovely walk away over the crag.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): ultimately imitative; perhaps from Dutch bommen 'to hum, buzz'.

Phrases

boom boom

British informal An exclamation made after delivering the punchline of a joke.
[popularized by the fox puppet Basil Brush, a character in a British television comedy show]
More example sentences
  • I've answered this question in some election hustings by saying I'd be the fish that swims against the tide… boom boom.
  • As Basil Brush used to say, ‘boom boom’!
  • Unfortunately, I have a conscience (although the band seem to have taken a day off for theirs - boom boom!).

Derivatives

boominess

noun
More example sentences
  • In this chamber setting there's less boominess to Grieg's music yet still the fuller sound we're familiar with in a work originally composed for piano.
  • The music sounded fuller and had more punch to it, and, again, I did not hear any boominess or muddiness.
  • These features control excessive boominess and balance the room's reverberation response.

boomy

adjective (boomier, boomiest)
More example sentences
  • The poor, boomy bass was not caused by the room itself.
  • I'm convinced that I'm forever cursed with boomy bass.
  • Has anyone here had success tweaking the drums, room, or recording equipment to achieve that big boomy drum sound?

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Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly

There are 3 definitions of boom in English:

boom2

Line breaks: boom
Pronunciation: /buːm
 
/

noun

A period of great prosperity or rapid economic growth: the London property boom [mass noun]: the eras of boom and bust
More example sentences
  • Thailand is relying on rising exports and a consumer-spending boom to double economic growth this year.
  • The growth figures suggest Ireland may recapture some of the form of the boom years when economic growth peaked at 11.5 per cent.
  • This added 1.5 per cent to economic growth in the boom years of the 1990s.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Experience a period of great prosperity or rapid economic growth: business is booming
More example sentences
  • The U.S. labor market was booming until an economic downturn began in 2001.
  • However, as economic times continue to boom, private label growth has occurred in the lower-income consumer demographic.
  • Equally, rates could rise to high single digits if world peace was in jeopardy or economic growth boomed.

Origin

late 19th century (originally US): probably from boom1.

Derivatives

boomlet

noun
More example sentences
  • There are no savings left to fund new projects that would be undertaken after this little boomlet.
  • But if the projections of jobs and a subsequent biotech boomlet pan out, those investors are going to reap the benefits.
  • After the debacle of the telecom crash, it might be hard for greed to spark another boom or even boomlet.

boomy

adjective (boomier, boomiest)

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Definition of boom in:

There are 3 definitions of boom in English:

boom3

Line breaks: boom
Pronunciation: /buːm
 
/

noun

1A pivoted spar to which the foot of a vessel’s sail is attached, allowing the angle of the sail to be changed.
More example sentences
  • She has a square sail on two booms, which I shall see is fully repaired, and there is little else to do to make her ready.
  • The wind caught the sails with a dull boom and the ship heeled about, tacking into the westerly breeze sweeping across the lake.
  • So a sheet is a rope, a tack is a turn into the wind and the boom is the spar along the bottom of the sail.
2 [often as modifier] A movable arm over a television or film set, carrying a microphone or camera: a boom mike
More example sentences
  • Already the media was on the scene, in the building, hanging boom microphones and video cameras out the windows on either side of the woman.
  • No studio, no financing, no known actors just a cameraman, boom man, front man, and some extras.
  • Lucy pointed, too, and made some gurgles, and even patted the boom mike while the cameras rolled.
3A floating beam used to contain oil spills or to form a barrier across the mouth of a harbour or river.
More example sentences
  • Our bays and inlets could be protected by floating booms and where they exist, by closing sluice gates,’ she said.
  • Officers from the Environment Agency stretched a number of booms across the river to contain the diesel and prevent it from travelling further downstream.
  • The operator is also required to provide a boom across the river to stop boats approaching the weir.

Origin

mid 16th century (in the general sense 'beam, pole'): from Dutch, 'beam, tree, pole'; related to beam.

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