Definition of buddy in English:

buddy

Line breaks: buddy
Pronunciation: /ˈbʌdi
 
/
informal , chiefly North American

noun (plural buddies)

1A close friend: they had become the best of buddies
More example sentences
  • Sure I have friends, but not real friends, not the kind of close buddies that you share everything with.
  • As an aside, before Christmas I ran into a buddy from high school.
  • Sean is broke, so his best buddy and roommate Dee Loc suggests he gets a job at the local car wash.
1.1A working companion with whom close cooperation is required.
More example sentences
  • But Shaft spends the entire movie partnered with his cop buddies, all of whom are made to make a point of saying how much trouble they'll be in for helping Shaft.
  • One day, in a fit of tomfoolery, she and one of her coworker buddies dress up in a guest's expensive clothing.
  • My coworker buddy and I might be taking a knitting course together.
1.2A person who befriends and helps another with an incapacitating disease, typically AIDS: gay male counsellors, buddies, and helpline volunteers are available upon request
More example sentences
  • To combat this, the charity runs a buddy scheme, whereby volunteers befriend patients, offering support and companionship.
  • A buddy volunteer may also provide resource and referral information and emotional support for a person with HIV/AIDS over the telephone.
  • AIDS Buddies is a program aimed to bring a little comfort, a sense of social life, and community activity to the residents at the Don Miller House.
1.3Used as a form of address to a man whose name is not known: I’m working on it, buddy
More example sentences
  • I say ditch her and jump the next plane back here to Paris, buddy.
  • I've got some harsh words for you, buddy, so have a seat.
  • Where did you get your journalism degree, buddy?

verb (buddies, buddying, buddied)

[no object] Back to top  
Become friendly and spend time with someone: I decided to buddy up to them
More example sentences
  • I'll admit that Tom opened the door for me, but I had to buddy up with them and get to know them just like everybody else before they let me into their little circle.
  • White rhinos apparently get a different benefit from buddying up.
  • One night in the summer of 1971, he buddied up to Wylie in the infield to inquire about the car.

Origin

mid 19th century (originally US): perhaps an alteration of brother, or a variant of butty2.

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