Definition of buffo in English:

buffo

Line breaks: buffo
Pronunciation: /ˈbʊfəʊ
 
/

noun (plural buffos)

A comic actor in Italian opera.
More example sentences
  • Donald Maxwell is a seasoned operatic buffo, who nicely cherishes, relishes and polishes his pontificating arias, with chorus usually dancing attendance.
  • Joel Katz played the buffo Sacristan with humour, and the required nervous tics so meticulously notated in Puccini's score.
  • English buffo Ian Wallace lacks the ripeness and buzz of the best Italian buffos, but the voice is substantial enough and his mastery of the text is never in doubt; his expertise shows through particularly during the "Gioa pace!" scene.

adjective

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Of or typical of Italian comic opera: a buffo character
More example sentences
  • Finally, Saskia Willaert writes in some details about the buffo opera singer and the repertory of Italian opera in London.
  • By now, it should come as no surprise that Juan Diego Flórez is the ideal Rossini tenor, combining youthful charm with florid razzle-dazzle, or that Ferruccio Furlanetto (Mustafà) and Earle Patriarco are masters of the buffo idiom.
  • After this quintessence of the buffo style, La Cenerentola, while not lacking in comic situations, is more sentimentally inclined, and in the remaining years of his Italian career Rossini produced no comedy at all.

Origin

mid 18th century: Italian, 'puff of wind, buffoon', from buffare 'to puff', of imitative origin.

Definition of buffo in:

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