There are 4 definitions of bully in English:

bully1

Line breaks: bully
Pronunciation: /ˈbʊli
 
/

noun (plural bullies)

verb (bullies, bullying, bullied)

[with object] Back to top  

Origin

mid 16th century: probably from Middle Dutch boele 'lover'. Original use was as a term of endearment applied to either sex; it later became a familiar form of address to a male friend. The current sense dates from the late 17th century.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 4 definitions of bully in English:

bully2

Line breaks: bully
Pronunciation: /ˈbʊli
 
/

adjective

informal , chiefly North American
  • Very good; excellent: the statue really looked bully
    More example sentences
    • It's a bully conclusion to a riveting journey through time.
    • That is why this franchise is the closest yet to possibly, maybe, being that bully team the NFL has lacked since the Cowboys faded almost a decade ago.

Phrases

bully for you! (or him etc.)

often • ironic Used to express admiration or approval: he got away—bully for him!
More example sentences
  • Yummy, bully for you!
  • And I say bully for him.
  • Bully for her, and bully for you if you have a similar situation.

Origin

late 16th century (originally used of a person, meaning 'admirable, gallant, jolly'): from bully1. The current sense dates from the mid 19th century.

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Definition of bully in:

There are 4 definitions of bully in English:

bully3

Line breaks: bully
Pronunciation: /ˈbʊli
 
/
(also bully beef)

noun

[mass noun] informal
  • Corned beef.
    More example sentences
    • She opened the back door only to see thrown down on the lawn an empty can of her bully beef and, to make matters worse, an empty tin of her cat's food!
    • We had bacon too, bully beef, endless tea, and biscuits which were very hard.
    • They climb over each other, snatching spaghetti, Irish stew and bully beef from the air and each other.

Origin

mid 18th century: alteration of bouilli.

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Definition of bully in:

There are 4 definitions of bully in English:

bully4

Line breaks: bully
Pronunciation: /ˈbʊli
 
/

noun (plural bullies)

  • (also bully off) An act of starting play in field hockey, in which two opponents strike each other’s sticks three times and then go for the ball.
    More example sentences
    • Use the bully to put the ball into play when play has been stopped for injury.
    • If there is a stop in action, the re-start is called a Bully.
    • The ball is put in play in midfield in a face-off, known as a bully.

verb (bullies, bullying, bullied)

[no object] Back to top  
  • (also bully off) (In field hockey) start play with a bully.
    More example sentences
    • To bully, both players simultaneously strike first the ground then each other's stick over the ball.
    • Every player shall be between the ball and his own goal line, except the two players who are bullying, who shall stand facing the side lines.
    • Just like bullying off in hockey this game should be fast and furious, but the puck and sticks stay low and fingers are best kept out of the way!

Origin

late 19th century (originally denoting a scrum in Eton football): of unknown origin.

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