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canonic

Line breaks: ca|non¦ic
Pronunciation: /kəˈnɒnɪk
 
/

Definition of canonic in English:

adjective

1 Music In canon form: a remarkable four-voiced canonic Kyrie
More example sentences
  • Nevertheless, in some of the ‘Gloria’ sections of his canticles Purcell indulges in ingenious canonic writing, inspired it seems by earlier examples by Child and Blow.
  • The title is not random; canonic counterpoint gives this music its hermetic quality, and one can draw parallels between the music's busy patterns and the busy patterns of city living.
  • The work mixes long, singing lines with fugal and canonic sections.
2 another term for canonical.
Example sentences
  • Highly prominent within this prolific output of Marian images are three canonic oil-pastel-on-paper portraits by Yolanda Lopez of herself, her mother, and grandmother, each in the guise of la Guadalupana.
  • The staged play of this canonic text includes snatches of 50 poems in the first act, and a 60-minute adaptation of Beautiful Losers, Cohen's still-controversial second novel, in the second.
  • However, he is at pains to point out that there is no one author of the canonic interpretation of a particular building; it is developed collectively over time, the cumulative, filtered effect of many previous responses.

Origin

Old English (as a noun): from Old French canonique or Latin canonicus 'canonical', from Greek kanonikos, from kanon 'rule' (see canon1). The adjective dates from the late 15th century.

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