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cauliflower

Line breaks: cauli|flower
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒlɪflaʊə
 
/

Definition of cauliflower in English:

noun

1A cabbage of a variety which bears a large immature flower head of small creamy-white flower buds.
Example sentences
  • Among the varieties, there were 15 white cauliflowers, 3 purple cauliflowers, four broccolis, and a collard.
  • Cabbages and cauliflowers have to go from Jubilee Allotment gardens, Kendal, so the Cumbria Education Department can raise a crop of healthy children.
  • Varieties of kale will cross-pollinate, as well as with cabbages and cauliflowers.
1.1 [mass noun] The flower head of the cauliflower eaten as a vegetable.
Example sentences
  • Shred the vegetables and put cauliflower, beans and carrots in a pot of water, add some salt, take them out after boiling.
  • It is said to counteract flatulence and is often used in the cooking of pulses and other ‘windy’ vegetables such as cauliflower.
  • It came with seasonal vegetables including cauliflower, carrots, new potatoes and sliced courgettes.

Origin

late 16th century: from obsolete French chou fleuri 'flowered cabbage', probably from Italian cavolfiore or modern Latin cauliflora. The original English form colieflorie or cole-flory had its first element influenced by cole; the second element was influenced by flower during the 17th century.

More
  • Cauliflower is a modified form of the Italian cavoli fiori, literally ‘cabbage flowers’—cavoli comes from Latin caulis ‘cabbage’, the source also of kale (Middle English). The original 16th-century English forms colieflorie and cole-flory had their first element influenced by the cole (Old English) ‘cabbage’, and only later was the spelling changed to match the original Latin root.

Words that rhyme with cauliflower

mayflowerwallflower

Definition of cauliflower in:

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Pronunciation: ˈɛmjʊləs
adjective
seeking to emulate someone or something