There are 4 definitions of chase in English:

chase1

Line breaks: chase
Pronunciation: /tʃeɪs
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Pursue in order to catch or catch up with: police chased the stolen car through the city [no object]: the dog chased after the stick
More example sentences
  • Police arrived and the group fled across fields but were caught when police chased them using a helicopter.
  • I chased after her and caught her left arm with my free hand, forcing her to stop.
  • She chased after her, catching her by the back of her skirt and pulling her to a halt on the second stair.
Synonyms
pursue, run after, follow, hunt, track, trail; give chase to, be hot on someone's heels
informal tail
1.1Seek to attain: the team are chasing their first home win this season
More example sentences
  • The composure we saw against Italy at Hampden and against Norway in Oslo had gone, blown away by a visiting team chasing a cause.
  • But that was far from the end of the action, with both teams chasing another goal as though their life depended on it.
  • Performance is the only criterion by which a team chasing greatness can judge itself.
1.2Seek the company of (a member of the opposite sex) in an obvious way: he spends all his free time chasing girls
More example sentences
  • Ed, Rick and Benett in particular are sad cases and spend most of their time chasing members of the opposite sex.
  • ‘They should be out drinking or chasing the opposite sex, but they are here getting stuck in,’ says Naughton.
  • Agatha was a famous beauty from a noble family, who was chased after by the villainous senator.
Synonyms
court, woo, pursue, run after, seek the company of, make advances to, make up to, flirt with, romance
informal chat up, make (sheep's) eyes at, give the come-on to, come on to, be all over
Australian informal track with, track square with
dated set one's cap at, pay addresses to, pay suit to, pay court to, seek the hand of, make love to
archaic spark
2 [with object and adverbial of direction] Drive or cause to go in a specified direction: she chased him out of the house
More example sentences
  • The birds were docile on the drive, so the TV people chased them across the road to get some shots of them crossing, being careful to stay out of shot themselves.
  • Every time it ends up being even more of an ordeal than the previous time and I am really sick and tired of them to the point where I just feel like picking up a stick and chasing all of them out of my life.
  • But they were ready to claim as many as 28 to 30 seats based upon a slogan of chasing the government loyalists out of office.
Synonyms
drive away, drive off, drive out, put to flight, send away, scare off, scatter
informal send packing
2.1 [no object, with adverbial of direction] Rush in a specified direction: he chased down the motorway
More example sentences
  • Gone were the rucksacked school kids, chattering and chasing around the old ladies who hobbled along almost in slow motion with yappy dogs and hair in a bun and little trolleys full of bread.
  • I'd chase along the street nearest the river, dodging out side streets to the riverbank.
  • We managed to get our group together and chased along the route.
Synonyms
rush, dash, race, speed, streak, shoot, charge, career, scramble, scurry, hurry, make haste, hare, fly, pelt
informal scoot, belt, tear, zip, whip, go like a bat out of hell
North American informal boogie, hightail, clip
North American vulgar slang drag/tear/haul ass
informal , dated cut along
archaic post, hie
3Try to obtain (something owed or required): the company employs people to chase up debts
More example sentences
  • This has helped fuel unsustainable levels of borrowing, which has led to a record £5 billion worth of debt being chased by debt collectors.
  • Parish council chairman Kate Brown said: ‘It is of great concern that you have to keep chasing up answers.’
  • Behind the scenes, however, things could be looking up for Cowling after Councillor John Alderson got onto the district council this week to chase up the matter.
3.1Try to make contact with (someone) in order to obtain something owed or required: the council recently appointed its own team of bailiffs to chase non-payers
More example sentences
  • Do you ever have those days where it feels like all you're doing is nagging and chasing people up in order to get them to do the stuff they'd actually promised to do already?
  • But then I feel like I'm chasing people up more and more to be able to do this.
  • I spend a lot of time chasing people for information, and it hurts, I tell you.
3.2 (chase something up (or US down)) Make further investigation of an unresolved matter.
More example sentences
  • The investigator is now chasing up leads back in the UK.
  • If my passion for finding the truth, if my enthusiasm for chasing up lines of enquiry came across to some people as giving an appearance of bias or pre-judgement then I regret that.
  • They're only saying that they are chasing up new leads at the moment.

noun

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1An act of pursuing someone or something: they captured the youths after a brief chase
More example sentences
  • Police believe witnesses who saw the car either before the chase, during the pursuit or afterwards could have very important information.
  • A police van called to the house spotted a BMW and the stolen Mercedes heading in the opposite direction but the car got away after a brief chase.
  • From car and snowmobile chases to walking on the ceiling with modified shoes and infiltrating hidden laboratories, Cody has to use all his training to save the world - and maybe get the girl.
Synonyms
pursuit, hunt, trail; hunting, coursing, course
1.1 short for steeplechase.
More example sentences
  • Racing will commence at 4.30 and the mixed card will consist of three flat races, three chases and a bumper for five, six and seven year olds.
  • He reminded spectators that hunts were also the backbone of point-to-point race meetings, team chases and a range of social events, as well as the Pony Club - the biggest youth club in the country.
  • Racing begins at 3.05 and the mixed card consists of four flat events, including two six furlong races, two chases and two hurdles.
1.2 (the chase) Hunting as a sport: she was an ardent follower of the chase
More example sentences
  • The thrill of the sport lies in the chase and the hounds tracking the fox.
  • The thrill of the chase is secondary because of the need to keep the fox population down.
  • It seems that few kings had much time for the thrills of the chase and, in most cases, the hunting was done by professionals to provide meat for feasts and as gifts.
1.3 [in place names] British An area of unenclosed land formerly reserved for hunting: Cannock Chase
More example sentences
  • Cannock Chase has rolling hills, heathers, quiet forests and wild fallow deer.
  • Cannock Chase is home to large populations of nocturnal animals, therefore we ask that you enjoy the forest during daylight hours only and allow the wildlife to recuperate without disturbance.
1.4 archaic A hunted animal.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chacier (verb), chace (noun), based on Latin captare 'continue to take', from capere 'take'.

Phrases

chase the game

(In soccer) adopt attacking tactics, especially when losing, at the risk of being vulnerable to counter-attack: we made the mistake of trying to chase the game instead of playing it tight
More example sentences
  • It would be as well, however, if Eriksson's players do not lapse back into their bad habits of the qualifiers and find themselves having to chase the game against Denmark after conceding a goal.
  • It left us chasing the game when we had worked so hard to get level.
  • Croatia can feel aggrieved by the half-time scoreline, but you sense it will be difficult for them to change their approach in the second half if they have to start chasing the game.

chase shadows

Pursue illusory targets: I found that the three-day mission did little more than chase shadows
More example sentences
  • Monaco's players are just stroking the ball around for fun now, with the Chelsea players reduced to chasing shadows.
  • Some of the one-touch football in the latter stages of the first half left Rotherham chasing shadows.
  • Many others would have driven themselves mad chasing shadows for 12 fruitless rounds.

give chase

Go in pursuit: a patrol car gave chase and finally overtook him officers gave chase to one of the thieves
More example sentences
  • The officers gave chase and finally caught up with the suspect vehicle as it came to a standstill in heavy city traffic.
  • Police gave chase, finally forcing the driver to pull off the road.
  • When the van refused to stop, police gave chase and the four men were shot during the pursuit.
Synonyms
chase, pursue, run after, follow, hunt, track, trail; be hot on someone's heels
informal tail

go and chase oneself

[in imperative] informal Go away.
More example sentences
  • Go and chase yourself away from this house!
  • You'd better go and chase yourself round the square a few times.

the thrill of the chase

see thrill.

Definition of chase in:

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Word of the day ween
Pronunciation: wiːn
verb
be of the opinion; think or suppose

There are 4 definitions of chase in English:

chase2

Line breaks: chase
Pronunciation: /tʃeɪs
 
/

verb

[with object] (usually as adjective chased)
Engrave (metal, or a design on metal): a miniature container with a delicately chased floral design
More example sentences
  • The gold foil is chased from the inside with details incised on the exterior.
  • A third of all Roman brooches found in Britain have some applied decoration, and most of the rest have relief decoration that is cast in, chased, punched or engraved.
  • The swirling movement of the dense repoussé and chased decoration and the sinuous spout and handle are in perfect balance.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: apparently from earlier enchase, from Old French enchasser.

Definition of chase in:

There are 4 definitions of chase in English:

chase3

Line breaks: chase
Pronunciation: /tʃeɪs
 
/

noun

(In letterpress printing) a metal frame for holding the composed type and blocks being printed at one time.
More example sentences
  • On to a perfectly level tabletop known as ‘the stone,’ he dropped a heavy metal chase.
  • The types are set up in a metal chase, which is fitted with a handle and can be used as a stamp.

Origin

late 16th century: from French châsse, from Latin capsa 'box' (see case2).

Definition of chase in:

There are 4 definitions of chase in English:

chase4

Line breaks: chase
Pronunciation: /tʃeɪs
 
/

noun

1The part of a gun enclosing the bore.
More example sentences
  • Since powder pressure was greatest toward the breech, this part of the gun tube was thicker than the chase.
  • Earlier models often had a molding, or at least a sharp discontinuity, between the reinforce and chase.
2A groove or furrow cut in the face of a wall or other surface to receive a pipe or wire.
More example sentences
  • Common chases - spaces for piping, ductwork and wiring - also must be designed to distribute the utility supply to tenant areas.
  • Next, all new air-conditioning ducts had to be installed in the original wall chases.
  • For example, photos of a pipe chase can be placed in the model with information tags to identify each pipe and duct.

Origin

early 17th century: from French chas 'enclosed space', from Provençal cas, caus, from medieval Latin capsum 'thorax or nave of a church'.

Definition of chase in: