Definition of chorale in English:

chorale

Line breaks: chor|ale
Pronunciation: /kɒˈrɑːl
 
/

noun

1A stately hymn tune, especially one associated with the German Lutheran Church.
More example sentences
  • Fervent disputes were aroused by prayer in the vernacular, chorales after Protestant models, mixed choirs, and organ-playing.
  • The second movement, most directly connected with a funeral, pits the second choir, singing a chorale on the fragility of human life, against a florid commentary on God's mercy.
  • The Thirty Years War severely disrupted German liturgical life and fostered the composition of comparatively subjective chorales which could also be used for personal devotions.
1.1A musical composition consisting of or resembling a harmonized version of a chorale.
More example sentences
  • It's not a huge piece, more a quiet reflection starting from the chorale and developing a certain drama midway through, with a moment of inspired clarity at the end, as high chords soothe away the preceding tensions.
  • Although a fugue, it moves very much like a chorale.
  • Depending on the student's learning style, a teacher might ask a student to play the chord while naming the next chord in the chorale.
2US A choir or choral society.
More example sentences
  • In addition to his work at WOI Radio, Compton sings in his church choir, assists with Iowa State's Chamber Singers student chorale and serves as organizer/agent for an a cappella men's vocal group, The Music Men.
  • Not only does Long Beach boast an eclectic art scene, the city is home to world-class art museums, internationally renowned theater companies, its own symphony orchestra, opera company and master chorale.
  • Together the chorale perform a wide repertoire of classical music from Bach, Handel and Vivaldi as well as traditional spiritual and Filipino pieces, several a cappella works and well known songs of praise.

Origin

mid 19th century: from German Choral(gesang), translating medieval Latin cantus choralis.

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