Definition of chortle in English:

chortle

Line breaks: chor¦tle
Pronunciation: /ˈtʃɔːt(ə)l
 
/

verb

[no object]
Laugh in a noisy, gleeful way: he chortled at his own execrable pun
More example sentences
  • His rapt audience, 16 Indian cricket players in blue blazers, chortled in approval, and later took turns to pump the general's hand.
  • My wife chortled and guffawed too, but neither of us can explain why it works.
  • You've probably chortled to yourself as you realised your mistake.
Synonyms

noun

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A noisy, gleeful laugh: Thomas gave a chortle
More example sentences
  • But the chortles, chuckles and giggles are part of a much more serious project.
  • The moments when the camera zooms in on Max's conniving face usually sparked a chortle of laughter from my son.
  • All laughter is highly stereotyped, and our giggles, chortles, and guffaws - even if their context or sonic structure conveys irony or other emotional nuances - are variations on one basic theme.

Origin

1871: coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking Glass; probably a blend of chuckle and snort.

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily