Definition of cinnabar in English:

cinnabar

Line breaks: cin¦na|bar
Pronunciation: /ˈsɪnəbɑː
 
/

noun

1 [mass noun] A bright red mineral consisting of mercury sulphide, sometimes used as a pigment.
More example sentences
  • Allergy to tattoo pigment is rare, but reaction to cinnabar, the red pigment, is the most common.
  • But, among what Ms. Moore lists as ‘poisonous’ pigments are cinnabar and realgar.
  • Some of the oldest focus not on gold but on cinnabar, the red mineral mercury sulphide.
1.1The bright red colour of cinnabar: [as modifier]: the blood coagulated in cinnabar threads
More example sentences
  • The yellow is paired with a brilliant, beautiful cinnabar red.
  • The thick curly mass of her cinnabar hair hung heavily, almost to her waist when wet.
  • The white plaster dust had been washed out of his hair and now his rich cinnabar mane shone.
2 (also cinnabar moth) A day-flying moth with black and red wings, whose black and yellow caterpillars feed on groundsel and ragwort.
  • Tyria jacobaeae, family Arctiidae
More example sentences
  • In recent years, ragwort hysteria has led to a decline in numbers of cinnabars.
  • Ragwort is the food plant for more than 70 species of insects, most notably the cinnabar moth.
  • Ragwort supports the life cycle of a multitude of creatures, most notably the cinnabar moth.

Origin

Middle English: from Latin cinnabaris, from Greek kinnabari, of oriental origin.

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected