Definition of clarion in English:

clarion

Line breaks: clar|ion
Pronunciation: /ˈklarɪən
 
/

noun

historical
1A shrill narrow-tubed war trumpet.
More example sentences
  • They talk, shout, create ‘the warlike sound / Of trumpets loud and clarions… Sonorous metal blowing martial sounds ’.
1.1An organ stop with a quality resembling that of a clarion.

adjective

literary Back to top  
Loud and clear: clarion trumpeters
More example sentences
  • In the solo arias in the first and third acts, Pavarotti rang out the high notes with that clarion sonority that is unmistakably his.
  • His clarion tone and beautiful phrasing were a model of superb instrumental control and mastery.
  • Then, too, the ideal voice for this heroic part needs the sort of declamatory clarion brilliance that the Italians call 'squillo'.

Origin

Middle English: from medieval Latin clario(n-), from Latin clarus 'clear'.

Phrases

clarion call

A strongly expressed demand or request for action: he issued a clarion call to young people to join the Party
More example sentences
  • Forty years ago, Fanon was issuing a clarion call against imperialism.
  • Public opposition to a conflict remains strong and a clarion call has gone out from anti-war organisations across the world to stage protests from the first day of war.
  • Kennedy issued his clarion call to mobilize Americans against these threatening prospects.

Definition of clarion in:

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