Definition of clerical in English:

clerical

Line breaks: cler|ic¦al
Pronunciation: /ˈklɛrɪk(ə)l
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

clericalism

noun
sense 2.
More example sentences
  • The revolutionaries of 1789 fought in the name of secularism against the clericalism of feudal society, and enacted a firm separation of church and state.
  • In the past, as a reaction to clericalism, we have sometimes expected our priests to be ‘one of the guys,’ and perhaps this is where we have erred.
  • It is simply clericalism to suggest that religious leaders and public intellectuals ‘own’ the just war tradition in a singular way.

clericalist

noun
sense 2.
More example sentences
  • As a young adult, his activities led to his being pursued by clericalists and monarchists alike, and he had to take refuge outside France.
  • As this work goes forward, it will be essential to set aside the clericalist mentality that raises obstacles to clear thinking.
  • The clericalist career pattern of ‘promotion’ to a larger and more prominent diocese or archdiocese should be abandoned.

clerically

adverb
More example sentences
  • They doggedly believe that EC should just clerically run the elections which must be ordered by them, for their benefit, at their convenience.
  • They are laying the pillars of a new, clerically protected democratic order.
  • This new government, however, managed to alienate the native population by seizing clerically held lands, closing religious schools, and abolishing shariat courts.

Origin

late 15th century (in sense 2): from ecclesiastical Latin clericalis, from clericus 'clergyman' (see cleric).

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