There are 2 definitions of clock in English:

clock1

Line breaks: clock
Pronunciation: /klɒk
 
/

noun

  • 1A mechanical or electrical device for measuring time, indicating hours, minutes, and sometimes seconds by hands on a round dial or by displayed figures: the church clock struck four [as modifier]: a clock face
    More example sentences
    • He watched the ticking on his bedside clock until the minute hand felt more like the hour hand.
    • I rolled over and looked at the digital alarm clock on my bedside table.
    • I glanced at the digital alarm clock by my bed.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1 (the clock) Time taken as a factor in an activity, especially in competitive sports: this stage is played against the clock
    More example sentences
    • Each competitor has to complete the activity against the clock, with the one who completes the circuit in the fastest time the winner.
    • In a time trial racers go one at a time competing only against the clock going out alone with no teammates to help.
    • Champagne corks were popping when a three-week project against the clock was completed in time at a community centre in Ulverston.
  • 1.2 informal A measuring device such as a speedometer, taximeter, or milometer: a car with over 82,000 miles on the clock
    More example sentences
    • I have a great 1995 Mercedes with just 115,000 on the clock.
    • Firstly, most comparable cars seen in Namibia had over 180 000 km on the clock.
    • I knew that I wanted a smallish 2004 automatic model with as few as possible kilometres on the clock.
    Synonyms
  • 1.3 Computing An electronic device used to initiate and synchronize internal operations.
    More example sentences
    • With files shared among a large number of workstations, it becomes imperative that machines have their clocks synchronized so that file time stamps are globally comparable.
    • Finally, it is good practice to synchronize the clocks of all nodes using ntpd or something similar.
    • They can be connected to the serial port of a PC and provide time signals synchronized on the NIST clock.
  • 2British A downy spherical seed head, especially that of a dandelion.
    More example sentences
    • Field edge paths have fancy dandelions, namely goats beard, broadcasting their large clocks of seeds.
    • Arabidopsis has open rosette leaves during the day and directs its leaves upward at night and this leaf movement is controlled by the circadian clock.
    • Nonetheless, the circadian clock of plants is currently being dissected and this evidence may be helpful for hypothesis formation.
  • 3British informal A person’s face: I thought I recognized your clock

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Attain or register (a specified time, distance, or speed): Thomas has clocked up forty years service [no object]: this is a generous CD, clocking in at more than 60 minutes
    More example sentences
    • In a recent test, the prototype clocked a maximum speed of 193 mph, earning it the title of world's fastest EV limousine.
    • Despite rain-slickened roads, they clocked an average speed of 53.71 kph - the third fastest ever.
    • Having clocked a speed of just over 240 miles per hour, this car still holds the record as the fastest production car ever.
    Synonyms
    register, record, log; achieve, attain, accomplish, gain, earn, win, make
    informal do, chalk up, notch up, rack up, bag, turn in, knock up
  • 1.1Achieve (a victory): he clocked up his first win of the year
    More example sentences
    • Meanwhile, Civil Service had their best result of the season when they clocked a ten-wicket victory over New Earswick.
    • I clocked up 32 victories and 2 charged sigils in survival mode playing Tekken Tag Tournament yesterday.
    • After clocking up seven consecutive victories at the start of the league season, they were beaten by Sheffield.
  • 1.2Record as attaining a specified time or rate: the tower operators clocked a gust at 185 mph
    More example sentences
    • This means that the memory in E7205-based mainboards is clocked at the rate equal to the FSB frequency.
    • Monitoring of the A590 has clocked cars, motorbikes and vans going more than 100 mph.
    • The camera clocked the car at 51 mph and at 44 mph.
  • 2British informal Notice or watch: I noticed him clocking her in the mirror
    More example sentences
    • They did so, with a video camera, and clocked him dropping off a kitchen unit at an address he had no business visiting.
    • Greeks show they've clocked a pretty woman by stroking their fingers across their own chins.
    • Like the time in Canada, when he clocked a gorgeous fan in the hotel.
  • 3 informal , chiefly British Hit (someone), especially on the head: someone clocked him for no good reason
    More example sentences
    • He clocked me but by that time they had already smashed the front of the shop door.
    • And I'm going to clock the next person I hear quote the old Chinese proverb ‘may we live in interesting times’.
    • Only thing Doc could shoot out was his fist though, which he did, clocking the patient to the back of his head.
  • 4British informal Wind back the milometer of (a car) illegally in order to make the vehicle appear to have travelled fewer miles than it really has: beware of motorists who clock their car before selling it (as adjective clocked) they had sold clocked vehicles
    More example sentences
    • A Bedford second hand car dealership is being investigated by Trading Standards for selling clocked cars.
    • There may be hundreds of these vehicles that have been clocked and sold on.
    • In the mid-1990s he was fined for clocking cars and, more recently, was convicted of a passport fraud.

Phrases

round (or around) the clock

All day and all night: I’ve got a team working around the clock [as adjective]: round-the-clock surveillance
More example sentences
  • Meanwhile Glasgow City Council has pledged that staff will continue to work around the clock to ease road and footpath problems.
  • We fought around the clock and continued to support the Marines as they cleared houses.
  • The second day, we could have legitimately reported flights were taking off round the clock day and night.

turn (or put) back the clock

Return to the past or to a previous way of doing things: we can’t turn the clock back—what’s happened has happened no revolution can turn the clock back and abolish industry
More example sentences
  • She wishes she could turn back the clock and return to the innocence of childhhood.
  • Inspired by Strauss's hatred for liberal modernity, its goal is to turn back the clock on the liberal revolution and its achievements.
  • They want basically to run out the clock on the ground and to turn back the clock on the Supreme Court.

watch the clock

another way of saying clock-watch.
More example sentences
  • Show up on time, don't watch the clock, keep busy.
  • They never watched the clock, never dreaded Mondays, never worried about the years passing by.
  • One sign that I love my job is that I never watch the clock.

Phrasal verbs

clock in (or British on)

Register one’s arrival at work by means of an automatic recording clock: staff should clock in on arrival
More example sentences
  • The New Year's first arrival to Colchester clocked in at 2.25 am.
  • He was still staring at me when I walked in and clocked in on the register.
  • The first were time card machines in the early 20th century, which automated factory workers clocking in and out.

clock out (or British off)

Register one’s departure from work by means of an automatic recording clock: the night shift were clocking off
More example sentences
  • Mr Stead said all four workmates clocked out from Tyco Plastics in Armytage Road, Brighouse at 7.53 pm on August 2 last year.
  • Miners at troubled Hatfield Colliery near Doncaster have clocked out for the last time.
  • I don't wake up in the morning, clock in at nine and clock out again at five.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch klocke, based on medieval Latin clocca 'bell'.

More definitions of clock

Definition of clock in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 2 definitions of clock in English:

clock2

Line breaks: clock
Pronunciation: /klɒk
 
/

noun

  • An ornamental pattern woven or embroidered on the side of a stocking or sock near the ankle.
    More example sentences
    • I was wearing my powder-blue suit, with dark blue shirt, tie and display handkerchief, black brogues, black wool socks with dark blue clocks on them.
    • She wears her original outfit of fleecy jacket with embroidered clock.
    • The Spanish made socks from knitted silk and embroidered them with clock emblems.

Origin

mid 16th century: of unknown origin.

More definitions of clock

Definition of clock in: