There are 2 main definitions of cobble in English:

cobble1

Line breaks: cob¦ble
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒb(ə)l
 
/

noun

1A small round stone used to cover road surfaces: the sound of horses' hooves on the cobbles
More example sentences
  • The window in the study shattered as a piece of cobble flew into to it.
  • Among the items found were pieces of 12th century pottery, 12th or 14th century cobble and part of a hearth.
  • In total there are 148 square metres of accommodation, while outside, the back garden is laid in patio and cobble.
1.1 (cobbles) British Small round lumps of coal.
More example sentences
  • Cobbles of coal may be seen in the water showing the location of outcropping seams.
  • You make the big decision to finish and then they keep moving the dates to make sure they get every last cobble of coal.
  • I found I could relate this cobble to the very last year that the mine was being mined.

Origin

late Middle English: from cob1 + -le2.

Definition of cobble in:

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There are 2 main definitions of cobble in English:

cobble2

Line breaks: cob¦ble
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒb(ə)l
 
/

verb

[with object]
1 (cobble something together) Roughly assemble or produce something from available parts or elements: the film was imperfectly cobbled together from two separate stories
More example sentences
  • With the help of various agents we managed to cobble something together.
  • Anyway, hopefully between us we will be able to cobble something together.
  • Even if an agreement is cobbled together it will not please everyone.
Synonyms
prepare roughly/hastily, make roughly/hastily, put together roughly/hastily, scribble, improvise, devise, contrive, rig (up), patch together, jerry-build
British informal knock up
2 dated Repair (shoes): it had a tarnished brass knocker showing a pixie cobbling shoes
More example sentences
  • Modern economies rely on the division of labor, such that one needn't bake bread, smith tools and cobble shoes in a day's work.

Origin

late 15th century: back-formation from cobbler.

Definition of cobble in: