Definition of cobbler in English:

cobbler

Line breaks: cob|bler
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒblə
 
/

noun

1A person whose job is mending shoes.
More example sentences
  • He also worked as a master cobbler, mending shoes.
  • Each small community would have had its local cobbler who produced shoes to fit each individual customer uniquely.
  • The old cobbler who had been mending shoes in the doorway of a building was unexpectedly replaced by a stranger.
2 [mass noun] An iced drink made with wine or sherry, sugar, and lemon: sherry cobbler
3chiefly North American A fruit pie with a rich, thick, cake-like crust: apricot cobbler
More example sentences
  • For dessert, we ordered a peach and huckleberry cobbler with vanilla gelato and four spoons.
  • We eat our chicken and kugel, and then we serve the raspberry cobbler for dessert.
  • The cobblers I usually make have crumby toppings; this one would turn out biscuity.
4 (cobblers) British informal A man’s testicles: I’ve been kicked in the cobblers a few times
[from rhyming slang cobbler's awls 'balls']
4.1Nonsense: I thought it was a load of cobblers
More example sentences
  • It's all a load of cobblers really - the easiest way to ‘disarm’ the country would have been to not sell them the weapons in the first place.
  • The life industry pays lip service to the need for greater transparency, but it's a load of cobblers.
  • I've always thought your clash of civilisations thesis was - as we say here in Britain - a load of cobblers.
5Australian/NZ informal The last sheep to be shorn.
[ late 19th century: pun in allusion to the cobbler's last]

Origin

Middle English: of unknown origin.

Phrases

let the cobbler stick to his last

proverb People should only concern themselves with things they know something about.
[translating Latin ne sutor ultra crepidam]
More example sentences
  • My advise to the company: let the cobbler stick to his last.

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