There are 2 main definitions of cockle in English:

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cockle 1

Line breaks: cockle
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒk(ə)l/

noun

1An edible burrowing bivalve mollusc with a strong ribbed shell.
  • Genus Cardium, family Cardiidae
Example sentences
  • Naturally I look for something a little different such as Pepperami, garlic sausage meat, strong smelling cheeses, cockles or mussels.
  • Shellfish such as oysters, mussels, cockles, winkles, whelks and crabs were collected for food from the estuaries and sea shores.
  • While Brits eat turkey at Christmas, Spaniards look forward to festive feasts of clams, crabs, cockles, mussels, octopus and goose barnacles.
2 (also cockleshell) literary A small, shallow boat.
Example sentences
  • The crew of both remaining cockleshells placed limpet mines on the merchant ships they found in the harbour.

Phrases

warm the cockles of one's heart

1
Give one a comforting feeling of contentment.
Example sentences
  • Ah, it warms the cockles of your heart, doesn't it?
  • But it would be stretching credibility to suggest much of this game warmed the cockles of your heart.
  • The sixth race produced a contest to warm the cockles of your heart.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French coquille 'shell', based on Greek konkhulion, from konkhē 'conch'.

Words that rhyme with cockle

grockle

Definition of cockle in:

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There are 2 main definitions of cockle in English:

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cockle 2 Line breaks: cockle
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒk(ə)l/

verb

[no object]
(Of paper) form wrinkles or puckers: thin or lightweight paper cockles and warps when subjected to watercolour

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French coquiller 'blister (bread in cooking)', from coquille 'shell' (see cockle1).

Definition of cockle in:

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