There are 3 definitions of cog in English:

cog1

Line breaks: cog
Pronunciation: /kɒɡ
 
/

noun

1A wheel or bar with a series of projections on its edge, which transfers motion by engaging with projections on another wheel or bar: the cogs and springs of a watch
More example sentences
  • It is up to him to sacrifice himself, no longer the hub of Arsenal's wheel, but a cog in the machine.
  • Your thumb pushes the lever forward to achieve a lower gear (a bigger cog / smaller chainring).
  • This sort of regulation has induced stereotyped thinking in most officers, who themselves became cogs in the mechanically streamlined military machine.
1.1Each of the projections on a cog: applewood was the favourite material for the cogs or teeth of a cogwheel
More example sentences
  • ‘We're obviously proud every time Germany wins and like to think we're making a small contribution as small cogs in the big wheel,’ he said.
  • ‘What we are doing won't change the world but it's a small cog in a big wheel,’ he explained.
  • Is it really the duty of a minor cog in a big wheel to take a stand and risk the consequences?

Origin

Middle English: probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Swedish kugge and Norwegian kug.

Phrases

a cog in the (or a) machine (or wheel)

A small or insignificant member of a larger organization or system: copywriters have been seen as just a cog in the big advertising machine
More example sentences
  • Running your own organisation is a big change from just being a cog in the machine.
  • His colleagues said he was being treated like "a cog in a machine".
  • I don't like being a cog in the machine.

Derivatives

cogged

adjective
More example sentences
  • Engines had a cogged pinion wheel that engaged the rack, helping them climb the slopes.
  • The number one solution to the problem is to give the odd number of cogged wheels a half-twist, thus reversing the parity of the system and allowing all of the gears to turn.
  • Any closed-circle arrangements of interlocked cogged wheels must have an even number of wheels, if it is to operate.

Definition of cog in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

There are 3 definitions of cog in English:

cog2

Line breaks: cog
Pronunciation: /kɒɡ
 
/

noun

A broadly built medieval ship with a rounded prow and stern.
More example sentences
  • The cog was a broadly built ship, with a roundish prow and stern, more manœuvrable than the old kind and specifically designed for carrying freight.
  • These had rounded hulls and strakes gathered into the upper end of the latter and not, as in a cog, ending at the stem and stern posts.
  • The poor state of the roads meant a considerable amount of river and coastal traffic, mainly in barges or cogs.

Origin

Middle English: related to Middle Dutch kogge, Old French cogue.

Definition of cog in:

There are 3 definitions of cog in English:

cog3

Line breaks: cog
Pronunciation: /kɒɡ
 
/

verb

[with object] Irish informal
Copy (someone else’s work) illicitly or without acknowledgement: he’s away cogging his homework from Aggie’s wee girl
More example sentences
  • I should mention, I suppose, that I cogged the photos off the film site.
  • What I do remember, though, is that someone came up to me a few days later and said that I had cogged the ideas from another columnist.
  • Still, you have to start somewhere, so if you happen to be stuck for words, who do you cog?

Origin

mid 16th century (in senses 'practise tricks in throwing dice' and 'cheat'): of unknown origin.

Definition of cog in: