Definition of commensurable in English:

commensurable

Line breaks: com|men¦sur|able
Pronunciation: /kəˈmɛnʃ(ə)rəb(ə)l
 
, -sjə-/

adjective

1Measurable by the same standard: the finite is not commensurable with the infinite
More example sentences
  • They encouraged practices and beliefs that were commensurable with a disenchanted outlook.
  • But the Human Rights Act has also done an excellent job of promoting the idea that individual rights can be negotiated, because they are commensurable with other considerations.
  • Because socialists demand the maximum freedom for individuals commensurable with the freedom of all.
2 (commensurable to) rare Proportionate to.
More example sentences
  • The service of the members of the Committee is commensurable to the service of the Board of Directors.
  • The salary given is commensurable to educational qualifications and working experience of the candidate.
  • The high-skilled IT specialists are not paid the salaries commensurable to the European ones because of the costs of life and the salary level in Ukraine.
3 Mathematics (Of numbers) in a ratio equal to a ratio of integers.
More example sentences
  • Book five lays out the work of Eudoxus on proportion applied to commensurable and incommensurable magnitudes.
  • The aim of Book X is to investigate the commensurable and the incommensurable, the rational and irrational continuous quantities.’
  • In this he discussed whether the celestial motions are commensurable or, expressed another way, is there a basic time interval so that the day, month, and year are all exact integer multiples of it.

Origin

mid 16th century: from late Latin commensurabilis, from com- 'together' + mensurabilis, from mensurare 'to measure'.

Derivatives

commensurability

Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • The attempt to bind those fields closer together leads Herbert at times into inconsistencies that point up the difficulty of finding comprehensible commensurability across disciplines.
  • Such language brings us back to Dimock's premise of commensurability, the law's exercise in abstractions that ‘assigns due weight to disparate things’.
  • The last decade has seen many attempts to carry out multiple criterion synchronization without assuming such commensurability.

commensurably

adverb
More example sentences
  • The contracted fees from the television station for the warm-up matches will be commensurably less.
  • As the shares the candidates desire exceed 100 per cent, they will be reduced commensurably down to 14.3 per cent each.
  • If Scotland qualify for the quarter-finals, the prices will be commensurably higher as the tournament enters its closing stages.

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected