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commonable

Line breaks: com¦mon|able
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒmənəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of commonable in English:

adjective

British , chiefly historical
1(Of land) allowed to be jointly used or owned: the idea of having rights on the commonable land
More example sentences
  • If the meeting so resolved, the Commissioners were to ascertain the names of the parties who were entitled to estates, rights, and interests in the common and commonable lands, and the amount or value of their respective rights.
  • He and his tenants agreed in 1658 that he should enjoy the 500 acres in Barroway Fen and certain other waste fens and commonable grounds.
  • The commonable places as well as the houses are fully equipped for the comfortable and qualitative stay of our clients.
1.1(Of an animal) allowed to be pastured on public land: these Acts exclude the deer and commonable cattle
More example sentences
  • Originally all commonable animals had to be removed from the forest during fence month.
  • The Conservators may set the number of commonable animals which may be kept on the Forest; all commonable animals must be properly marked.
  • An Agister is ‘on call’ day and night and responsible for the welfare of every commonable animal in his part of the forest.

Origin

early 17th century: from obsolete common 'to exercise right of common' + -able.

Definition of commonable in:

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