Definition of contiguity in English:

contiguity

Line breaks: con|tigu¦ity
Pronunciation: /ˌkɒntɪˈɡjuːɪti
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1The state of bordering or being in contact with something: nations bound together by geographical contiguity
More example sentences
  • The essence of this concept is a limited form of community interest, usually involving a small group of states in geographical contiguity, who exercise shared rights over the resources in question.
  • Their geographical contiguity must have come to be regarded as a zone of political proximity if not a frontier or border of some kind.
  • By the medieval times, linguistic violence and hatred for each other had become unbridgeable, with geographic contiguity between the Caliphates and the Byzantine empire stoking the fires of Holy War.
1.1 Psychology The sequential occurrence or proximity of stimulus and response, causing their association in the mind: contiguity is necessary in all forms of learning
More example sentences
  • First, he argued that the synaptic connections between neurons of the cortex increased in efficiency in proportion to a degree to which there had been temporal contiguity in their pre- and post-synaptic physiological activity.
  • However, as Deacon notes, many things can be said to have physical or temporal contiguity so there must be something more to this interpretative process.
  • At the same time, through similarity and contiguity, the infant constellates the child archetype in the mother.

Origin

early 16th century: from late Latin contiguitas, from Latin contiguus 'touching' (see contiguous).

Definition of contiguity in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌɪntəˈniːsʌɪn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict