There are 2 definitions of cope in English:

cope1

Line breaks: cope
Pronunciation: /kəʊp
 
/

verb

[no object]

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'meet in battle, come to blows'): from Old French coper, colper, from cop, colp 'a blow', via Latin from Greek kolaphos 'blow with the fist'.

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Word of the day grotesquerie
Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively

There are 2 definitions of cope in English:

cope2

Line breaks: cope
Pronunciation: /kəʊp
 
/

noun

  • 1A long, loose cloak worn by a priest or bishop on ceremonial occasions.
    More example sentences
    • Here she was vested in her robes of state and was met by the bishop who was to perform the ceremony, with all the chapel Royal in their copes, the bishop mitred.
    • Made between 1300 and 1320, the cope would have been worn by a high-ranking priest or bishop.
    • Saints embroidered in metallic and silk threads decorate the orphrey, the ornamental band along the top of the cope as pictured here.
  • 1.1 technical or • literary A thing resembling or likened to a cloak: the outer shell of clay is called the cope

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • (In building) cover (a joint or structure) with a coping: (as adjective coped) a coped joint

Origin

Middle English (denoting a long outdoor cloak): from medieval Latin capa, variant of late Latin cappa (see cap1 and cape1).

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