There are 2 definitions of cope in English:

cope1

Line breaks: cope
Pronunciation: /kəʊp
 
/

verb

[no object]
1(Of a person) deal effectively with something difficult: his ability to cope with stress it all got too much for me and I couldn’t cope
More example sentences
  • All I can say about it is nice people are easy to deal with and unpleasant people are much more difficult to cope with.
  • Urban and rural dwellers have adopted creative survival strategies, that have helped them cope with difficult times.
  • In a police interview the 39-year-old unemployed man, who is not being identified for legal reasons, admitted he found it difficult to cope with the children.
Synonyms
manage, survive, subsist, look after oneself, fend for oneself, shift for oneself, stand on one's own two feet, carry on, get through, get on, get along, get by, muddle through, muddle along, scrape by, bear up, make the grade, come through, hold one's own, keep one's end up, keep one's head above water, keep the wolf from the door, weather the storm
informal rub along
deal with, handle, manage, address, face, face up to, confront, tackle, sort out, take care of, take in hand, get to grips with, contend with, grapple with, wrestle with, struggle with, tussle with; put up with, get through, weather, endure, withstand, stand up to, bear, brave, accept, come to terms with; master, overcome, surmount, get over, get the better of, beat
informal stomach, swallow
1.1(Of a machine or system) have the capacity to deal successfully with: the roads are barely adequate to cope with the present traffic
More example sentences
  • At this time of year, we are at our most busiest and occasionally, we get more film in than the printer processing machine can cope with.
  • This is not to say the court system couldn't cope with some reform to deal with new situations.
  • Research indicates that something as simple as drinking a liter of sports drink per hour appears to help the immune system cope with intense exercise.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'meet in battle, come to blows'): from Old French coper, colper, from cop, colp 'a blow', via Latin from Greek kolaphos 'blow with the fist'.

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Word of the day punctum
Pronunciation: ˈpʌŋ(k)təm
noun
a small, distinct point

There are 2 definitions of cope in English:

cope2

Line breaks: cope
Pronunciation: /kəʊp
 
/

noun

1A long, loose cloak worn by a priest or bishop on ceremonial occasions.
More example sentences
  • Here she was vested in her robes of state and was met by the bishop who was to perform the ceremony, with all the chapel Royal in their copes, the bishop mitred.
  • Made between 1300 and 1320, the cope would have been worn by a high-ranking priest or bishop.
  • Saints embroidered in metallic and silk threads decorate the orphrey, the ornamental band along the top of the cope as pictured here.
1.1 technical or literary A thing resembling or likened to a cloak: the outer shell of clay is called the cope

verb

[with object] Back to top  
(In building) cover (a joint or structure) with a coping: (as adjective coped) a coped joint

Origin

Middle English (denoting a long outdoor cloak): from medieval Latin capa, variant of late Latin cappa (see cap1 and cape1).

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