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copula

Line breaks: cop¦ula
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒpjʊlə
 
/

Definition of copula in English:

noun

Logic & Grammar
A connecting word, in particular a form of the verb be connecting a subject and complement.
Example sentences
  • In such cases they fulfil the basic requirement of Syriac sentence structure (namely, that the predicate must be conjugated for person) twice: once within the copula, and once within the verb of existence.
  • For linguists it is now standard to think of indefinite descriptions following the copula as always being predicational, and it is a widespread belief that definite descriptions following the copula are often predicational.
  • In Hungarian, the zero copula occurs only in the third person, and in AAVE it is not permitted in the first person singular.

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin, 'connection, linking of words', from co- 'together' + apere 'fasten'.

Derivatives

copular

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • AAVE is like Finnish in that it has a separate copular verb of negation meaning ‘not be’, pronounced ain't, and you need that here.
  • There are some cases where we can't tell whether there is a triple-re-ordering, fronting with subject-aux inversion, or just a strange copular order.
  • It can't be used on a non-verbal predicate (so in sentences like ‘The man is a teacher’ or ‘The woman is tall’ - there's no copular verb), but that's not a perfect argument.

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