There are 2 main definitions of corn in English:

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corn1

Line breaks: corn
Pronunciation: /kɔːn
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1British The chief cereal crop of a district, especially (in England) wheat or (in Scotland) oats: fields of corn
More example sentences
  • To a European, corn covers all the cereal crops - wheat, barley, oat, and so on.
  • Peas, beans or carrots also formed part of the diet, plus corn, i.e. oats or maize.
1.1The grain of a cereal crop.
Example sentences
  • Christopher says his biggest failure was cream corn.
  • His challenge was to eat creamed corn and cod liver oil.
  • I waded through enough surf-and-turfs and enough creamed corn to last a lifetime.
1.2 North American, Australian, and New Zealand term for maize.
Example sentences
  • The major agricultural products are wheat, rice, barley, corn, sorghum, sugarcane, potatoes, and fruits.
  • They also eat grains such as Chinese sorghum, corn, millet, oats, and buckwheat.
  • They grow lettuce, corn, parsley, sugar cane, rice and radishes.
Synonyms
2 informal Something banal or sentimental: the film is pure corn
More example sentences
  • The appetite audiences have for sentimental corn should never be underestimated.
  • Alexander's Ragtime Band is pure corn but rather tasty all the same.
  • God, will I forever be forced to deal with this massive amount of cheese and corn from now on…?

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch koren and German Korn.

More
  • Corn, meaning ‘the seed of wheat and similar plants’, is an Old English word whose root may date back as far as farming itself. The modern sense of corny is a development of an earlier sense, dating from the 1930s, that described something, especially music, of a simple and unsophisticated type that appealed to people living in the country. Kernel (Old English) is based on corn and was originally a ‘little corn or seed’. The other kind of corn (Late Middle English), the small area of thickened horn-like skin on your foot, comes from Latin cornu ‘horn’. Cornu, which could also mean ‘tip’ or ‘corner’, is the source too of corner (Middle English)—you can think of a corner as the part of something that sticks out or forms the tip.

    The trumpet-like cornet (Late Middle English) is now made from brass, but it was originally a wind instrument made out of a horn, and Latin cornu is again the source. The early 20th century ice-cream cornet gets its name because it resembles that of the instrument. One brand of ice cream is called a Cornetto (‘little horn’), and this Italian word was also the name of an old musical instrument, a straight or curved wooden wind instrument with finger holes and a cup-shaped mouthpiece. See also horn

Phrases

corn on the cob

1
Maize when cooked and eaten straight from the cob.
Example sentences
  • Around her, hundreds of people were also enjoying barbecue beef sandwiches and corn on the cob.
  • My eyes nearly popped out of my head when I saw that dinner for the evening was to consist of rough hewn pork, corn on the cob, a messy cabbage-type salad and what I presumed were beef cutlets.
  • Serve with steak fries, corn on the cob (you can do that on the grill, too), and the simplest salad you can think of.

Definition of corn in:

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There are 2 main definitions of corn in English:

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corn2

Line breaks: corn
Pronunciation: /kɔːn
 
/

noun

A small, painful area of thickened skin on the foot, especially on the toes, caused by pressure.
Example sentences
  • A variety of products are available over-the-counter for the treatment of common foot problems, such as athlete's foot, onychomycosis, foot pain, corns, warts and bunions.
  • Deepika is my foot guru who, in half an hour, will transform my unattractive foot complete with corns, calluses and untidy-looking toes into a thing of beauty.
  • In addition, soaking your feet in warm water or with Epsom salts can alleviate painful corns and calluses.

Origin

late Middle English: via Anglo-Norman French from Latin cornu 'horn'.

More
  • Corn, meaning ‘the seed of wheat and similar plants’, is an Old English word whose root may date back as far as farming itself. The modern sense of corny is a development of an earlier sense, dating from the 1930s, that described something, especially music, of a simple and unsophisticated type that appealed to people living in the country. Kernel (Old English) is based on corn and was originally a ‘little corn or seed’. The other kind of corn (Late Middle English), the small area of thickened horn-like skin on your foot, comes from Latin cornu ‘horn’. Cornu, which could also mean ‘tip’ or ‘corner’, is the source too of corner (Middle English)—you can think of a corner as the part of something that sticks out or forms the tip.

    The trumpet-like cornet (Late Middle English) is now made from brass, but it was originally a wind instrument made out of a horn, and Latin cornu is again the source. The early 20th century ice-cream cornet gets its name because it resembles that of the instrument. One brand of ice cream is called a Cornetto (‘little horn’), and this Italian word was also the name of an old musical instrument, a straight or curved wooden wind instrument with finger holes and a cup-shaped mouthpiece. See also horn

Definition of corn in:

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