There are 3 definitions of corporal in English:

corporal1

Line breaks: cor|poral
Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːp(ə)r(ə)l
 
/

noun

  • 1A rank of non-commissioned officer in the army, above lance corporal or private first class and below sergeant.
    More example sentences
    • The Americans - three corporals and one private first class - were from the 4th Ranger Company and had volunteered for a classified mission.
    • Maybe he can sell it to generals, but not many privates, corporals and second lieutenants.
    • He then would assign to his men the ranks of sergeant, corporal, private and so on.
  • 2 (also ship's corporal) British historical A petty officer who attended solely to police matters, under the master-at-arms.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French, obsolete variant of caporal, from Italian caporale, probably based on Latin corpus, corpor- 'body (of troops)', with a change of spelling in Italian due to association with capo 'head'.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kəːf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 3 definitions of corporal in English:

corporal2

Line breaks: cor|poral
Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːp(ə)r(ə)l
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

corporally

adverb
More example sentences
  • The researchers began by interviewing mothers of the 5-year-old twins to gauge whether children had been punished corporally, through spanking or slapping.
  • Someone is going to get burned financially, legally, or worst of all corporally if they continue to operate under ignorant supposition.
  • When they ‘do not perform’, they are corporally punished and sometimes denied meals.

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from Latin corporalis, from corpus, corpor- 'body'.

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There are 3 definitions of corporal in English:

corporal3

Line breaks: cor|poral
Pronunciation: /ˈkɔːp(ə)r(ə)l
 
/

noun

  • A cloth on which the chalice and paten are placed during the celebration of the Eucharist.

Origin

Middle English: from medieval Latin corporale (pallium) 'body (cloth)', from Latin corpus, corpor- 'body'.

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