Definition of corroborate in English:

corroborate

Line breaks: cor|rob¦or|ate
Pronunciation: /kəˈrɒbəreɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

corroborative

Pronunciation: /-rətɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Most of the examples we use to illustrate the theoretical constructs we propose here come from our own data corpus, supported by corroborative cases from the literature whenever possible.
  • All too rarely is corroborative material offered in support.
  • I was most concerned there was an attempt to mould them so they were corroborative, which I felt was misguided and false.

corroborator

noun
More example sentences
  • I told my mother what I'd seen and she said ‘Well, we'll have to ring June’ who is the local birdwatching corroborator.
  • That is right, but there could be cases, could there not, where the applicant has been so comprehensively destroyed that that leads you to disbelieve the corroborator?
  • Any competent investigator would have to stop right here and point out that the corroborator's testimony has been corrupted by the method of inquiry.

corroboratory

Pronunciation: /-rət(ə)ri/
adjective
More example sentences
  • It still needs more corroboratory research, but it looks like it is good for you!
  • The corroboratory evidence of history tells us that lawyers have controlled the arguments in parliament for over 500 years.

Origin

mid 16th century (in the sense 'make physically stronger'): from Latin corroborat- 'strengthened', from the verb corroborare, from cor- 'together' + roborare, from robur 'strength'.

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Pronunciation: mɪˈlɔːd
noun
used to address an English nobleman