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crimson

Line breaks: crim|son
Pronunciation: /ˈkrɪmz(ə)n
 
/

Definition of crimson in English:

adjective

Of a rich deep red colour inclining to purple: she blushed crimson with embarrassment
More example sentences
  • The tree was covered in deep crimson flowers and filled with bright red papers.
  • The stone's value comes from its intense purple and crimson colour.
  • He succeeded in breeding a particularly bright crimson variety of the flower.

noun

[mass noun] Back to top  
A rich deep red colour inclining to purple: a pair of corduroy trousers in livid crimson, they were horrid to behold
More example sentences
  • The artist's palette encompasses earthy, weather worn colours, rich burnished crimsons and flashes of red.
  • Watt bought some red roses for herself and began to make a series of images - folds of material painted in deep crimson, the colour of roses, or of blood.
  • The world around him resonated with the color of the man's eyes, turning everything a deep hue of crimson.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
(Of a person’s face) become flushed, especially through embarrassment: my face crimsoned and my hands began to shake
More example sentences
  • Her face crimsoning with fury, Isabella suddenly turned away from her friend and quickened her pace down the road.
  • No matter how she blushed or crimsoned, most people who gathered at the Fine Arts Hall seemed to have enjoyed the judge's faux pas.
  • ‘Oh, they say everyone has,’ she says, crimsoning.

Origin

late Middle English: from obsolete French cramoisin or Old Spanish cremesin, based on Arabic qirmizī, from qirmiz (see kermes). Compare with carmine.

Definition of crimson in:

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