There are 2 main definitions of crock in English:

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crock 1

Line breaks: crock

noun

1An earthenware pot or jar: the runner beans were then packed in layers of salt in large crocks
More example sentences
  • When we were nearly done planting, Michael went down to the root cellar and brought back a bucket and two earthenware crocks.
  • Similarly, ‘printed’ butter could also be packed in large crocks, covered with salt water, and cooled in the springhouse.
  • The beans, most often scarlet runners, were sliced and salted in a crock for the winter.
Synonyms
earthenware pot, pot, jar, urn, pitcher, jug, ewer;
vessel, container, receptacle, repository;
North American creamer
historical jorum
archaic reservatory
1.1A broken piece of earthenware.
Example sentences
  • Last month's included a tip new to me, using teabags instead of crocks for the bottom of containers.
1.2A plate, cup, or other item of crockery: I ate my tea and then I washed up the dirty crocks
More example sentences
  • In fact, if the dirty crocks get too mountainous, they can simply chuck them away.
  • Peter fires a hose of steaming water at the crocks before they're run through the main dishwashers.
Synonyms
2 (also vulgar slang crock of shit) chiefly North American Something considered to be complete nonsense: this whole business of an electronic community is a crock what a crock!

Origin

Old English croc, crocca, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse krukka and probably to Dutch kruik and German Krug.

Words that rhyme with crock

ad hoc, amok, Bangkok, baroque, belle époque, bloc, block, bock, brock, chock, chock-a-block, clock, doc, dock, floc, flock, frock, hock, hough, interlock, jock, knock, langue d'oc, lock, Locke, Médoc, mock, nock, o'clock, pock, post hoc, roc, rock, schlock, shock, smock, sock, Spock, stock, wok, yapok

Definition of crock in:

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There are 2 main definitions of crock in English:

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crock 2 Line breaks: crock
informal

noun

British
1An old person who is considered to be feeble and useless: I’m an old crock and he’s an old buffer
More example sentences
  • As we sprinted away from home plate, I found myself in the disconcerting position of being a step behind the old crock.
  • How, a perplexed public is asking, did a thirty-nine year old crock manage to swim through the air and prevent what was a certain goal?
  • He plays a pompous old crock of a secondary teacher.
1.1An old and worn-out vehicle.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1British Injure (part of the body): he crocked a shoulder in the test against South Africa
More example sentences
  • He has a habit, he admits ruefully, of crocking himself.
  • He had got off to a flyer in the first Test against New Zealand, and then crocked his shoulder.
  • Has anyone else nearly crocked their ankle on the newly re-laid cobbles?
1.1 (as adjective crocked) North American Drunk: his party guests were pretty crocked
More example sentences
  • On the surface, of course, the trip seemed like a fantastic lark - drive to Louisville, do some interviews, and get crocked with the good Doctor.
  • It wouldn't be long before Bill would show up at some meeting just crocked.
  • Getting crocked up to the eyeballs before the clock had ticked over from am to pm was not a good habit to get into.

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps from Flemish, and probably related to crack. Originally a Scots term for an old ewe, it came in the late 19th century to denote an old or broken-down horse.

Definition of crock in:

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