There are 2 definitions of crock in English:

crock1

Line breaks: crock
Pronunciation: /krɒk
 
/

noun

1An earthenware pot or jar: the runner beans were then packed in layers of salt in large crocks
More example sentences
  • When we were nearly done planting, Michael went down to the root cellar and brought back a bucket and two earthenware crocks.
  • Similarly, ‘printed’ butter could also be packed in large crocks, covered with salt water, and cooled in the springhouse.
  • The beans, most often scarlet runners, were sliced and salted in a crock for the winter.
Synonyms
earthenware pot, pot, jar, urn, pitcher, jug, ewer; vessel, container, receptacle, repository; North Americancreamer
historical jorum
archaic reservatory
1.1A broken piece of earthenware.
More example sentences
  • Last month's included a tip new to me, using teabags instead of crocks for the bottom of containers.
1.2A plate, cup, or other item of crockery: I ate my tea and then I washed up the dirty crocks
More example sentences
  • In fact, if the dirty crocks get too mountainous, they can simply chuck them away.
  • Peter fires a hose of steaming water at the crocks before they're run through the main dishwashers.
Synonyms
2 (also vulgar slang crock of shit) chiefly North American Something considered to be complete nonsense: this whole business of an electronic community is a crock what a crock!

Origin

Old English croc, crocca, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse krukka and probably to Dutch kruik and German Krug.

Definition of crock in:

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Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: niːˈɒt(ə)ni
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal

There are 2 definitions of crock in English:

crock2

Line breaks: crock
Pronunciation: /krɒk
 
/
informal

noun

British
1An old person who is considered to be feeble and useless: I’m an old crock and he’s an old buffer
More example sentences
  • As we sprinted away from home plate, I found myself in the disconcerting position of being a step behind the old crock.
  • How, a perplexed public is asking, did a thirty-nine year old crock manage to swim through the air and prevent what was a certain goal?
  • He plays a pompous old crock of a secondary teacher.
1.1An old and worn-out vehicle.

verb

[with object] British Back to top  
1Injure (part of the body): he crocked a shoulder in the test against South Africa
More example sentences
  • He has a habit, he admits ruefully, of crocking himself.
  • He had got off to a flyer in the first Test against New Zealand, and then crocked his shoulder.
  • Has anyone else nearly crocked their ankle on the newly re-laid cobbles?
1.1 (as adjective crocked) North American Drunk: his party guests were pretty crocked
More example sentences
  • On the surface, of course, the trip seemed like a fantastic lark - drive to Louisville, do some interviews, and get crocked with the good Doctor.
  • It wouldn't be long before Bill would show up at some meeting just crocked.
  • Getting crocked up to the eyeballs before the clock had ticked over from am to pm was not a good habit to get into.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps from Flemish, and probably related to crack. Originally a Scots term for an old ewe, it came in the late 19th century to denote an old or broken-down horse.

Definition of crock in: