There are 2 main definitions of croup in English:

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croup1

Line breaks: croup
Pronunciation: /kruːp
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
Inflammation of the larynx and trachea in children, associated with infection and causing breathing difficulties.
Example sentences
  • These types of virus do not always cause the breathing difficulties associated with croup.
  • In addition to the effects on the upper airway, the infections that cause croup can result in inflammation further down the airway, including the bronchi (breathing tubes) and the lungs.
  • At least 90% of children with cough have a respiratory tract infection such as a cold, croup, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, whooping cough, or pneumonia.

Origin

mid 18th century: from dialect croup 'to croak', of imitative origin.

More
  • crop from (Old English):

    From around ad 700 to the late 18th century crop, related to group (late 17th century), had a sense ‘flower head, ear of corn’, which gave rise to the main modern meaning ‘a cultivated plant grown on a large scale’ and also to senses referring to the top of something, such as the verb uses ‘to cut very short’ or ‘to bite off and eat the tops of plants’. The sense ‘a very short hairstyle’ goes back to the late 18th century but is particularly associated with the 1920s, when the Eton crop, reminiscent of the style then worn at the English public school Eton, was fashionable for young women.

    To come a cropper is to suffer a defeat or disaster. The origin of the phrase may be the 19th-century hunting slang term ‘cropper’, meaning ‘a heavy fall’. Cropper probably came from neck and crop, an expression meaning ‘completely or thoroughly’ and originally used in the context of a horse falling to the ground. Crop here referred either to the rider's whip (originally the top part of a whip) or the horse's hindquarters. This sense is found in Old French croupe ‘rump’, which appears as croup in Middle English, and is the source of the crupper (Middle English), the bit of harness that goes from the saddle under the horse's tail, and which lies behind the word croupier (early 18th century). In early use, this was a term for a person standing behind a gambler to give advice, adopted from French, cropier ‘pillion rider, rider on the croup’.

Derivatives

croupy

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • A 21-month-old, previously healthy girl presented initially with a generalized rash and nonproductive cough, which progressively became croupy with moderate stridor.
  • If you are not able to break your child's fast breathing and croupy cough, call your child's doctor or seek medical attention as soon as possible.
  • If your child starts to make louder croupy noises when he or she breathes, try the following measures.

Definition of croup in:

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There are 2 main definitions of croup in English:

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croup2

Line breaks: croup
Pronunciation: /kruːp
 
/

noun

The rump or hindquarters, especially of a horse.
Example sentences
  • The powerful, level back slopes downward at the croup.
  • The horse was still sporting several bald patches due to a skin rash that has clustered near his flank, croup, and hip, but the condition has had no impact on his training.
  • Length in the neck, shoulder, forearm, croup, and from hip to hock helps a horse take longer strides for his size.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French croupe, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to crop.

More
  • crop from (Old English):

    From around ad 700 to the late 18th century crop, related to group (late 17th century), had a sense ‘flower head, ear of corn’, which gave rise to the main modern meaning ‘a cultivated plant grown on a large scale’ and also to senses referring to the top of something, such as the verb uses ‘to cut very short’ or ‘to bite off and eat the tops of plants’. The sense ‘a very short hairstyle’ goes back to the late 18th century but is particularly associated with the 1920s, when the Eton crop, reminiscent of the style then worn at the English public school Eton, was fashionable for young women.

    To come a cropper is to suffer a defeat or disaster. The origin of the phrase may be the 19th-century hunting slang term ‘cropper’, meaning ‘a heavy fall’. Cropper probably came from neck and crop, an expression meaning ‘completely or thoroughly’ and originally used in the context of a horse falling to the ground. Crop here referred either to the rider's whip (originally the top part of a whip) or the horse's hindquarters. This sense is found in Old French croupe ‘rump’, which appears as croup in Middle English, and is the source of the crupper (Middle English), the bit of harness that goes from the saddle under the horse's tail, and which lies behind the word croupier (early 18th century). In early use, this was a term for a person standing behind a gambler to give advice, adopted from French, cropier ‘pillion rider, rider on the croup’.

Definition of croup in:

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