Definition of cumulate in English:

cumulate

Line breaks: cu¦mu|late

verb

Pronunciation: /ˈkjuːmjʊleɪt
 
/
1 [with object] Gather together and combine: the systems cumulate data over a period of years
More example sentences
  • However, widespread adoption of such methods did not occur until he coined the term metaanalysis to describe quantitative techniques for cumulating results over studies.
  • We also define a coordinate, X, by cumulating the sum of one-dimensional displacements of all water molecules in the mentioned region every picosecond.
  • The data for twelve years, 1988 to 1999, were cumulated to have adequate frequencies in each price category.
1.1 [no object] Be gathered together and combined: all unpaid dividend payments cumulate and are paid when earnings are sufficient
More example sentences
  • It would be genuine social and political progress if that understanding could induce timely reform to avoid rigidities cumulating into a decade-long crisis of capitalism until reforms are implemented.
  • It seems to have cumulated into something bad, that I haven't talked to anyone about.
  • Should there be a question of the practical value of these results, Table 6 (in Appendix) presents the rather dramatic consequences of a small effect which cumulates consistently over time.
2 (as adjective cumulated) Chemistry Denoting two double bonds attached to the same carbon atom.
More example sentences
  • The potential energy of this system is very different from that of an all-atom force field and is related with cumulated harmonic energies of residue pairs.

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈkjuːmjʊlət
 
/
Geology Back to top  
An igneous rock formed by gravitational settling of particles in a magma: they appear to have formed from cumulates in the root of a magma chamber [as modifier]: cumulate gabbro
More example sentences
  • Plutonic rocks can be dense, silica-poor and dark in colour, like most cumulates, or silica-rich and pale in colour like the melt remaining after cumulate formation.
  • This is similar to cumulate rocks of the Sarmiento complex.
  • There are differences between cumulate rocks and those finer-grained gabbros and dykes that represent liquid compositions.

Origin

mid 16th century (as a verb in the sense 'gather in a heap'): from Latin cumulat- 'heaped', from the verb cumulare, from cumulus 'a heap'. Current senses date from the early 20th century.

Derivatives

cumulation

Pronunciation: /-ˈleɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • Science consists in the cumulation of small advances built on previous small advances, all in the service of testing a larger theory - so that the whole becomes a good deal greater than the sum of its parts.
  • Social forces are the cumulation and summation of the interrelated actions of individuals.
  • After that date the researcher is forced to rely on APAIS, the acronym for Australian Public Affairs Information Service, published by the National Library from 1945, in annual cumulations since 1955, and in electronic form back to 1978.

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be of the opinion; think or suppose