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curb

Line breaks: curb
Pronunciation: /kəːb
 
/

Definition of curb in English:

noun

1A check or restraint on something: plans to introduce tougher curbs on insider dealing
More example sentences
  • There should also be strict curbs on extravaganzas using power.
  • On Dec. 14, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board proposed stricter curbs on audit firms selling tax services to their clients.
  • Although some of his reforms were laudable, they were combined with strict curbs on the powers of the parliaments, convincing many that the hour of despotism had struck.
Synonyms
2 (also curb bit) A type of bit with a strap or chain attached which passes under a horse’s lower jaw, used as a check.
Example sentences
  • Too often I see people with track horses, who they are afraid of, sticking a big curb bit in their mouth.
  • The curb bit promises collection - contained energy, not free forward movement - and hence submission to the will of the rider.
  • The soldiers ride bays or chestnuts and use United States Army regulation saddles, saddlecloths, halters, bridles, and curb bits.
3North American variant spelling of kerb.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Restrain or keep in check: she promised she would curb her temper
More example sentences
  • Worries over job security will curb consumer spending.
  • In short, critics say, it could mean a return to the undisciplined days of a decade ago, before many governments had to curb runaway spending to qualify for the euro.
  • When she's not curbing her enthusiasm, where does she hang her hat?
Synonyms
restrain, hold back, keep back, hold in, repress, suppress, fight back, bite back, keep in check, check, control, keep under control, rein in, keep a tight rein on, contain, discipline, govern, bridle, tame, subdue, stifle, smother, swallow, choke back, muzzle, silence, muffle, strangle, gag;
limit, put a limit on, keep within bounds, put the brakes on, slow down, retard, restrict, constrain, deter, impede, inhibit;
freeze, peg
informal button up, keep a/the lid on
literary trammel
1.1Restrain (a horse) by means of a curb: both men were instinctively curbing their horses
More example sentences
  • The educational authorities have moved swiftly to curb this bucking bronco, whose 100 percent pass rates were the wonder of the land.
  • It didn't help that his holographic partner, a die-hard environmentalist, kept urging him to clean up after the mess; curbing a horse is not easy to do.
  • The raw energy, just curbed by their athletic riders, of the Parthenon horses comes to us straight from the ice age, from the dawn of humanity.

Origin

late 15th century (denoting a strap fastened to the bit): from Old French courber 'bend, bow', from Latin curvare (see curve).

More
  • A curb was a strap passing under the jaw of a horse and fastened to the bit, used for checking an unruly horse. This caused the horse to bend its neck, an action that produced the word. It derives from Old French courber ‘to bend or bow’, from Latin curvare, also the source of curve (Late Middle English). The idea of ‘holding back’ led to the more general sense of a check or restraint. Curb is also the American spelling of what in British English is a kerb (mid 17th century), a stone edging to a pavement or path. The original idea here was of a border or frame bending round something, for example, the top of a well or a trapdoor.

Words that rhyme with curb

acerb, blurb, disturb, herb, kerb, perturb, Serb, superb, verb

Definition of curb in:

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