Definition of daily in English:

daily

Line breaks: daily
Pronunciation: /ˈdeɪli
 
/

adjective

1Done, produced, or occurring every day or every weekday: a daily newspaper
More example sentences
  • No other media has the kind of reach that the daily newspaper has - every day.
  • During Lent, the daily weekday Mass will be at 8am in the parish church.
  • For the next year it ran as a daily programme on weekday mornings.
Synonyms
occurring/done/produced every day, everyday, day-to-day, quotidian
1.1Relating to the period of a single day: boats can be hired for a daily rate
More example sentences
  • Autorickshaw drivers demand a substantial part of one's daily earnings for a single long trip.
  • Counsel agree that the calculation of the lost fees using the average daily fees for that period is as follows.
  • A new method of calculating costs should be devised, with barristers paid on a monthly or yearly basis, or for work done, rather than a daily rate.

adverb

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Every day: the museum is open daily
More example sentences
  • They practice religiously during the summer - up to two hours daily - and meet twice a week in the winter.
  • It will be the duty of the depositors to verify daily whether the bank is opened daily or not.
  • The new route, which includes a brief stopover in Hong Kong, will leave twice daily every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.
Synonyms
every day, seven days a week; once a day, day after day, day by day, per diem
rare diurnally

noun (plural dailies)

informal Back to top  
1A newspaper published every day except Sunday: the trial was reported in all the popular dailies
More example sentences
  • Indian Express Newspapers publishes dailies with a combined readership of more than 5 million, including the highly influential Indian Express and Financial Express.
  • The 60 Minutes exchange is very familiar to readers of Arab newspapers, college dailies, and liberal journals of opinion.
  • Although Aiko's birth made banner headlines in the country's dailies and magazines, journalists have, by and large, followed a strict code of self-discipline.
2 (also daily help) British dated A woman who is employed to clean someone else’s house each day.
More example sentences
  • The Blethering Classes pretended their daily help or the woman in the corner shop was worried.
  • I hired a daily help - a pleasant middle-aged woman who agreed to keep the cottage clean and cook for me.
  • Most ‘dailies’ I have known have been disastrous.
3 (dailies) The first prints from cinematographic takes; the rushes: as a co-producer he has to view the dailies
More example sentences
  • Looking through dailies, Capra spied a blond, squeaky voiced lady who caught his eye.
  • I said, let's just take the dailies to a movie theater and see if we can see anything or not.
  • He directly influenced the flow of specific scenes in the dailies, but he was not present for the final cutting.

Origin

late Middle English: from day + -ly1, -ly2.

Phrases

daily life

The activities and experiences that constitute a person’s normal existence: the routines of my daily life
More example sentences
  • The way you experience your daily life will hinder your ability to cope.
  • It is true that people take their cues from what they see and experience in daily life.
  • This summary of body image accords with the common experiences of daily life.

Definition of daily in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something