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damaging

Line breaks: dam|aging
Pronunciation: /ˈdamɪdʒɪŋ
 
/

Definition of damaging in English:

adjective

1Causing physical damage: new cars are less damaging to the environment
More example sentences
  • Raisins are a great source of powerful antioxidants, which can help ward off the damaging effects of free radicals produced during exercise.
  • Adults are free to make their own decisions, regardless of whether the result is damaging to their health.
  • Keep your security protection software up to date to combat the spread of damaging computer viruses.
1.1Having a detrimental effect on someone or something: damaging allegations of corruption
More example sentences
  • Detectives are considering whether to pursue a criminal inquiry against the Cabinet members in a further damaging blow to the Prime Minister.
  • Over recent years the loss of Government jobs in Lismore has had a damaging effect on our economy.
  • The growing controversy surrounding the garda tyre deal must be damaging confidence in the force.

Derivatives

damagingly

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • His failure to grasp the purport and consequences of distinctively philosophical ideas becomes damagingly clear.
  • The King Canute mentality, which I believe is damagingly ingrained in City Hall, can no longer hold back the tide of change.
  • The government then intervened, twice, and very damagingly, in the process of primary curriculum reform.

Definition of damaging in:

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
dark; shadowy or obscure