Definition of damn in English:

damn

Line breaks: damn

verb

[with object]
  • 1 (be damned) (In Christian belief) be condemned by God to suffer eternal punishment in hell: I treated her badly and I’ll be damned to hell for it
    More example sentences
    • Those who receive the mark, according to Scripture, are damned to eternal punishment.
    • Mephistophilis is one of the angels who conspired with Lucifer and was damned to hell.
    • If God was so loving why were people who committed suicide immediately damned to hell.
  • 1.1Be doomed to misfortune or failure: the enterprise was damned
    More example sentences
    • Where the substance is glorified in this disc, the style, unfortunately, is damned.
    • It was not the country that was damned but the settler who felt in his heart that he was damned.
    • This isn't to say the project was damned, but rather the fact that it's more difficult to create a compelling work when it's based on music with no clear emotional ambit.

exclamation

informal Back to top  
  • Expressing anger or frustration: Damn! I completely forgot!
    More example sentences
    • I feel slightly better but my nose is still dripping… damn!
    • I just lost today's post because of a Blogger problem - damn!
    • Thought it was fine and dandy till it just struck me… damn!

adjective

[attributive] informal Back to top  
  • Used for emphasis, especially to express anger or frustration: turn that damn thing off! [as submodifier]: don’t be so damn silly!
    More example sentences
    • Then, what happened next shocked, angered, and confused him, which is a whole damn lot for a simple guy to be feeling all at once.
    • All but two of the candidates have reasons to be damn frustrated.
    • What the living hell am I doing in this damn silly job?

Phrases

as near as damn it

As close to being accurate as makes no difference.
More example sentences
  • Still at the top of the class, or as near as damn it, when it comes to hitting greens in regulation, Monty's number of putts per round deteriorated from 74th best on the European Tour in 1999 to 130th last year.
  • So much to do, so little time. I have, I confess, fallen behind on my unexpressed but firmly-made resolution to get something into this blog every day, or as near as damn it.
  • It amounted, as near as damn it, to the sort of income tax hike that the party had specifically ruled out both in 1997 and again in the run-up to the 2001 election.

—— be damned

Used to express defiance or rejection of someone or something previously mentioned: glory be damned!
More example sentences
  • Strategy be damned because we do not have secret proceedings in this country.
  • Since we haven't, we go with what we've got and do the best we can as human beings, doctrine be damned.
  • Pop punk past be damned, there's now no questioning the authenticity of Neko's C&W efforts.

damn all

British informal Nothing at all: there’s damn all you can do about it
More example sentences
  • I haven't commented largely because, as anyone who reads my site will know, I know damn all about economics.
  • There's just damn all on worth listening to between 2 and 5.
  • Anyway, that's got damn all to do with anything.

damn someone/thing with faint praise

Praise someone or something so unenthusiastically as to imply condemnation: it was a wretched review, damning poor Lisa with faint praise
More example sentences
  • In truth, she damns her idols with faint praise.
  • It was generally a good experience for him, but he damns his teachers with faint praise; they were adequate, but uninspiring.
  • He opens by damning the piece with faint praise, calling it ‘well-intentioned,’ possessing ‘merits of its own.’

I'm (or I'll be) damned if

informal Used to express a strong negative: I’m damned if I know
More example sentences
  • Well you never know she may not be the criminal I think she is but I'll be damned if that's so.
  • I already own more CDs than most other ‘regular’ people, and I'm damned if I'm gonna put up another shelf when the current one fills up.
  • I'm sure when I started writing this there was going to be a point to it but I'm damned if I can remember what it is.

not be worth a damn

informal Have no value at all: your evidence isn’t worth a damn
More example sentences
  • Disconcertingly, he replied: ‘It wasn't worth a damn.’
  • He said there was an emerging consensus in the media that a press council with no statutory recognition ‘isn't worth a damn ‘, but that a press council imposed from government would be a bad thing.’
  • As a neutral you'd have to feel sorry for Waterford but in real terms reaching another All-Ireland semi-final and losing it isn't worth a damn to them.
Synonyms
jot, whit, iota, rap, scrap, bit; one bit, even a little bit, the smallest amount, the tiniest bit
informal hoot, two hoots, tinker's cuss/curse, brass farthing

not give (or care) a damn

informal Not care at all: people who don’t give a damn about the environment

well I'll be (or I'm) damned

informal Used to express surprise: Well, I’ll be damned! What brings you here?
More example sentences
  • Well I'm damned; you are quite right.
  • Well, I'll be damned! What in tarnation are you doing in these parts?

Origin

Middle English: from Old French dam(p)ner, from Latin dam(p)nare 'inflict loss on', from damnum 'loss, damage'.

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Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively