Definition of damnify in English:

damnify

Line breaks: dam|nify
Pronunciation: /ˈdamnɪfʌɪ
 
/

verb (damnifies, damnifying, damnified)

[with object] English Law, rare
Cause injury to: Article 86 gives rise to a cause of action at the suit of a person damnified by its contravention
More example sentences
  • If the bailor is damnified by the terms of the sub-bailment he has a cause of action against the head bailee.
  • The defendants are justified in their contention that the remedy of the party damnified by the solicitor's misconduct will become illusory.
  • In such a case the court has the power, and the duty, at the instance of the Attorney General on behalf of the public or of a person damnified, to restrain the further exercise of those powers not in accord with the special act.

Origin

early 16th century: from Old French damnefier, dam(p)nifier, from late Latin damnificare 'injure, condemn', from Latin damnificus 'hurtful', from damnus 'loss, damage'.

Derivatives

damnification

Pronunciation: /-fɪˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • It was admitted, indeed, on the last argument, that the proceedings at Lancaster should be considered as evidence of a damnification; but that the defendant should be let into a full defence in this action.

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected