There are 2 main definitions of decollate in English:

decollate1

Line breaks: de|col¦late
Pronunciation: /dɪˈkɒleɪt
 
, ˈdɛkəleɪt/

verb

[with object] archaic
Behead (someone): the murderer is instantly decollated
More example sentences
  • You may remember him as the photographer from ‘The Omen’ who gets spectacularly decollated by a pane of glass…
  • The murderer is instantly decollated.
  • Upon taking off the cloth he beheld a human head just decollated.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin decollat- 'beheaded', from the verb decollare, from de- (expressing removal) + collum 'neck'.

Derivatives

decollation

noun
More example sentences
  • The decollation of St. Paul.
  • [He] strenuously denied the painlessness of decollation by the guillotine.

Definition of decollate in:

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There are 2 main definitions of decollate in English:

decollate2

Line breaks: de|col¦late
Pronunciation: /ˌdiːkəˈleɪt
 
/

verb

[no object]
Mechanically separate sheets of paper into different piles.
More example sentences
  • We have no more need for bursting and decollating multi-part stationery or lining up pre-printed stationery.
  • The symptoms reported by three of approximately 15 persons in the department were thought to be caused by decollating carbonless copy paper.
  • The Martin Yale 950 desktop decollator is capable of decollating three-part (five-ply) carbon-interleaved forms.

Origin

1960s: from de- 'away from' + collate.

Derivatives

decollation

noun

decollator

noun
More example sentences
  • Sets up, operates, and maintains multi-station decollator for separating computer printouts and carbons.
  • The 6022 is a high volume, variable speed decollator, capable of separating up to 430 A4 forms per minute.
  • The Ameraseal FD 510 is a two part tabletop decollator ideal for low to medium volume jobs.

Definition of decollate in: