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defeasible

Line breaks: de|feas|ible
Pronunciation: /dɪˈfiːzɪb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of defeasible in English:

adjective

chiefly Law & Philosophy
Open in principle to revision, valid objection, forfeiture, or annulment.
Example sentences
  • In the jargon, this means that any scientific claim is defeasible, meaning it is in principle open to revision or rejection in the light of further disclosures, arguments, or evidence.
  • They were not in any way, shape or form defeasible.
  • What they hold to be true is certain, not defeasible.

Origin

Middle English: via Anglo-Norman French from the stem of Old French desfesant 'undoing' (see also defeasance).

Derivatives

defeasibility

1
Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
Example sentences
  • However, this is just the inevitable defeasibility of any form of inference that depends on background empirical presuppositions.
  • The third feature of rational reasons is their defeasibility.
  • In the MMR case, however, people do not want to hear about defeasibility and inductive probability.

defeasibly

2
adverb
Example sentences
  • This technical report describes the construction of an experimental planner that finds plans by reasoning about them defeasibly rather than by running a search algorithm.
  • Most of the work in rational cognition is carried out by epistemic cognition, and must be done defeasibly.

Definition of defeasible in:

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