There are 2 main definitions of defect in English:

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defect1

Line breaks: de¦fect

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈdiːfɛkt
 
, dɪˈfɛkt
 
/
A shortcoming, imperfection, or lack: genetic defects [mass noun]: the property is free from defect
More example sentences
  • At the same time, our mind has the potential to become completely free of defects and limitations.
  • Many suffer needlessly from eye defects due top lack of knowledge and basic equipment.
  • These toxins can damage immune systems, trigger cancers and cause genetic defects.
Synonyms
snag, kink, deformity, blemish, taint, crack, break, tear, split, scratch, chip, fracture, spot;
mistake, error;
Computing bug, virus
informal glitch, gremlin

Origin

late Middle English (as a noun, influenced by Old French defect 'deficiency'): from Latin defectus, past participle of deficere 'desert or fail', from de- (expressing reversal) + facere 'do'.

More
  • effect from (Late Middle English):

    Effect ‘result, consequence’ from Latin effectus, from efficere ‘accomplish, work out’, formed from ex- ‘out, thoroughly’ and facere ‘do’. Its negative is defect (Late Middle English), while deficit (late 18th century) is from Latin deficit ‘it is lacking’, from the verb deficere. The Latin word was used formerly in inventories to record what was missing. Feckless (late 16th century) ‘lacking in efficiency or vitality’ is based on Scots and northern English dialect feck, a shortening of effeck, a variant of effect.

Definition of defect in:

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There are 2 main definitions of defect in English:

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defect2

Line breaks: de¦fect
Pronunciation: /dɪˈfɛkt
 
/

verb

[no object]
Abandon one’s country or cause in favour of an opposing one: he defected to the Soviet Union after the war
More example sentences
  • Managers for the candidates raced around the floor trying to pry delegates away from their opponents, and to keep those already on their side from defecting.
  • Alibekov defected to the United States in 1992, changed his name, and made the talk-show circuit.
  • He was one of about ten people who defected in that direction.
Synonyms
desert, go over to the enemy, change sides/loyalties/allegiances, turn traitor, rebel, renege, abscond, go AWOL, quit, escape;
shift ground, break faith, be apostate, apostatize;
abandon, renounce, repudiate, secede from, revolt against
informal rat on
archaic forsake

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin defect- 'failed', from the verb deficere (see defect1).

More
  • effect from (Late Middle English):

    Effect ‘result, consequence’ from Latin effectus, from efficere ‘accomplish, work out’, formed from ex- ‘out, thoroughly’ and facere ‘do’. Its negative is defect (Late Middle English), while deficit (late 18th century) is from Latin deficit ‘it is lacking’, from the verb deficere. The Latin word was used formerly in inventories to record what was missing. Feckless (late 16th century) ‘lacking in efficiency or vitality’ is based on Scots and northern English dialect feck, a shortening of effeck, a variant of effect.

Definition of defect in:

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